You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Who gave the throne to her Protestant son, James VI?
A Bloody Mary
B Elizabeth I
C Mary Tudor
D Mary, Queen of Scots
Correct Answer: Mary, Queen of Scots
Explanation: Mary was suspected of involvement and fled to England. She gave her throne to her Protestant son, James VI of Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
2. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
King Henry I was on the throne at the time of Magna Carta.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: There were few formal limits to the king's power until 1215. In that year, King John was forced by his noblemen to agree to a number of demands. The result was a charter of rights called the Magna Carta (which means the Great Charter). The Magna Carta established the idea that even the king was subject to the law.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - legal and political changes
3. Charles I believed, and tried to rule in line with, what principles?
A Communism
B Democracy
C Religious virtue
D The Diving Rights of Kings
Correct Answer: The Diving Rights of Kings
Explanation: James I and his son Charles I were less skilled politically. Both believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings': the idea that the king was directly appointed by God to rule.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious - The Tudors and Stuarts - The rise of the Parliament
4. During the First World War, the British fought against countries including Germany, the Ottoman Empire and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. What was this alliance known as?
A The Autocratic Power
B The Central Powers
C The Germanic Powers
D The Middle Powers
Correct Answer: The Central Powers
Explanation: The Allies fought against the Central Powers - mainly Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire and later Bulgaria.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The First World War
5. Who was Kenneth MacAlpin?
A A Danish King
B A Viking
C An Anglo-Saxon king
D The Scottish king
Correct Answer: The Scottish king
Explanation: In the north, the threat of attack by Vikings had encouraged the people to unite under one king, Kenneth MacAlpin. The term Scotland began to be used to describe that country.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Vikings
6. Which of these statements is correct?
A James I and Charles I believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings' and that they could rule without the approval of Parliament
B James I and Charles I were very skilled at negotiating with Parliament
Correct Answer: James I and Charles I believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings' and that they could rule without the approval of Parliament
Explanation: James I and his son Charles I were less skilled politically. Both believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings': the idea that the king was directly appointed by God to rule. They thought that the king should be able to act without having to seek approval from Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The rise of Parliament
7. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
During the Industrial Revolution, canals were built to link factories to cities, towns and ports, particularly in the middle and north of England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Canals were built to link the factories to towns and cities and to the ports, particularly in the new industrial areas in the middle and north of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - Industrial Revolution
8. In Scotland, the legal system developed differently from the one in England in that its laws were 'codified'. What is meant by codified?
A Based on tradition
B Dictated by Parliament
C Less complicated
D Written down
Correct Answer: Written down
Explanation: In Scotland, the legal system developed slightly differently and laws were 'codified' (that is, written down).
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - Legal and political changes
9. When did the first farmers come to Britain?
A 10,000 years ago
B 3,000 years ago
C 6,000 years ago
D 8,000 years go
Correct Answer: 6,000 years ago
Explanation: The first farmers arrived in Britain 6,000 years ago.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain
10. What happened to Catherine Parr
A She Died
B She had a daughter
C She had a son
D She was executed
Correct Answer: She Died
Explanation: Catherine Parr - Catherine was a widow who married Henry late in his life. She survived him and married again but died soon after.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
11. What did the missionaries teach the Anglo-Saxons?
A About Christianity
B About other cultures
C About other languages
D About trade
Correct Answer: About Christianity
Explanation: The Anglo-Saxons were not Christians when they first came to Britain but, during this period, missionaries came to Britain to preach about Christianity.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Anglo - Saxons
12. Mary Stuart, the queen of Scotland, was often known by which other name?
A Bloody Mary
B Mary Tudor
C Mary, Queen of Scots
D Mary, Queen of the Highlands
Correct Answer: Mary, Queen of Scots
Explanation: The queen of Scotland, Mary Stuart (often now called 'Mary, Queen of Scots') was a Catholic.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
13. What were women campaigning for the right to vote known as?
A Democrettes
B Feminettes
C Suffragettes
D Votettes
Correct Answer: Suffragettes
Explanation: In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an increasing number of women campaigned and demonstrated for greater rights and, in particular, the right to vote. They formed the women's suffrage movement and became known as 'suffragettes'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
14. Which of these statements about Roald Dahl is not true
A He began to publish books and short stories in the 1940s
B He had Norwegian parents
C He served in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War
D He served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War
Correct Answer: He served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War
Explanation: Roald Dahl was born in Wales to Norwegian parents. He served in the Royal Air Force during the Second World War. It was during the 1940s that he began to publish books and short stories. He is most well known for his children's books, although he also wrote for adults.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Conservative government from 1979 to 1997
15. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The language of the Iron Age was part of the Celtic language family.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The language they spoke was part of the Celtic language family.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain
16. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The whole British Empire was involved in the First World War, with troops from India, the West Indies, Africa, and Australia all fighting on behalf of the British.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The whole of the British Empire was involved in the conflict - for example, more than a million Indians fought on behalf of Britain in lots of different countries, and around 40,000 were killed. Men from the West Indies, Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Canada also fought with the British.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The First World War
17. Which of the following was a co-discoverer of insulin?
A John Logie Baird
B John MacLeod
C Sir Frank Whittle
D Sir Robert Watson-Watt
Correct Answer: John MacLeod
Explanation: The Scottish physician and researcher John Macleod (1876¬-1935) was the co-discoverer of insulin, used to treat diabetes.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
18. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The symbol of the House of Lancaster was a red rose and the symbol of the House of York was a white rose.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: This war was called the Wars of the Roses, because the symbol of Lancaster was a red rose and the symbol of York was a white rose.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The War of the Roses
19. During which king's reign in 1665 was there a major outbreak of plague in London?
A Charles I
B Charles II
C James I and Charles I were very skilled at negotiating with Parliament
D James II
Correct Answer: Charles II
Explanation: During Charles II's reign, in 1665, there was a major outbreak of plague in London.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Restoration
20. The Victorian period famously saw reformers leading moves to improve conditions for which section of society?
A The aristocracy
B The clergy
C The middle classes
D The poor
Correct Answer: The poor
Explanation: Within the UK, the middle classes became increasingly significant and a number of reformers led moves to improve conditions of life for the poor.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Victorian Age
21. Who could not get Parliament to agree to his or her religious and foreign policy views and tried to rule without Parliament?
A Bloody Mary
B Charles I
C Elizabeth I
D Henry VIII
Correct Answer: Charles I
Explanation: When Charles I inherited the thrones of England, Wales, Ireland and Scotland, he tried to rule in line with this principle. When he could not get Parliament to agree with his religious and foreign policies, he tried to rule without Parliament at all.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts- The rise of the Parliament
22. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Following the abolition of slavery, two million Chinese and Indian workers were employed to replace the freed slaves.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: After 1833, 2 million Indian and Chinese workers were employed to replace the freed slaves.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The slave trade
23. Which TWO of these careers did Winston Churchill follow before becoming a Conservative MP in 1900?
A Journalist
B Soldier
C Teacher
D Vicar
Correct Answer: Soldier, Journalist
Explanation: Churchill was the son of a politician and, before becoming a Conservative MP in 1900, was a soldier and journalist.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
24. During the reign of which king of England was the Domesday Book complied?
A Alfred the Great
B Harold
C Kenneth MacAlpin
D William the Conqueror
Correct Answer: William the Conqueror
Explanation: William sent people all over England to draw up lists of all the towns and villages. The people who lived there, who owned the land and what animals they owned were also listed. This was called Domesday Book.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain -- The Norman Conquest