You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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1. Which of these statements is correct?
A Sake Dean Mahomet introduced curry houses and shampooing to Britain from India.
B Sake Dean Mahomet is famous for introducing tea-drinking and bungalows to Britain from India.
Correct Answer: Sake Dean Mahomet introduced curry houses and shampooing to Britain from India.
Explanation: In 1810 he opened the Hindoostanee Coffee House in George Street, London. It was the first curry house to open in Britain. Mahomet and his wife also introduced 'shampooing', the Indian art of head massage, to Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
2. Emmeline Pankhurst is famous for her leadership of the campaign to give women the vote in parliamentary elections in the UK.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: She set up the Women's Franchise League in 1889, which fought to get the vote in local elections for married women.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
3. When was the last successful invasion of England?
A 1066
B 1415
C 1642
D 1940
Correct Answer: 1066
Explanation: In 1066, an invasion led by William, the Duke of Normandy (in what is now northern France), defeated Harold, the Saxon king of England, at the Battle of Hastings. Harold was killed in the battle. William became king of England and is known as William the Conqueror.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Norman Conquest
4. Where did the Vikings come from?
A Belgium and Holland
B Denmark and Norway
C France and Luxembourg
D Germany and Austria
Correct Answer: Denmark and Norway
Explanation: The Vikings came from Denmark and Norway.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Vikings
5. Which queen is remembered for her rebellion against the Romans?
A Anne
B Boudicca
C Elizabeth
D Victoria
Correct Answer: Boudicca
Explanation: One of the tribal leaders who fought against the Romans was Boudicca, the queen of the Iceni in what is now eastern England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Romans
6. Which of these statements is correct?
A American colonists were eventually defeated by the British.
B In 1776 some American colonies declared their independence from Britain.
Correct Answer: In 1776 some American colonies declared their independence from Britain.
Explanation: In 1776, 13 American colonies declared their independence, stating that people had a right to establish their own governments.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The American War of Independence
7. For approximately how many years did the Romans stay in this country?
A 100 years
B 400 years
C 50 years
D 600 years
Correct Answer: 400 years
Explanation: The Romans remained in Britain for 400 years.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Romans
8. Which TWO of the following were famous Victorians?
A Dylan Thomas
B Florence Nightingale
C Isambard Kingdom Brunel
D Margaret Thatcher
Correct Answer: Florence Nightingale, Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Explanation: Brunel was originally from Portsmouth, England. He was an engineer who built tunnels, bridges, railway lines and ships; In 1854, she went to Turkey and worked in military hospitals, treating soldiers who were fighting in the Crimean War. She and her fellow nurses improved the conditions in the hospital and reduced the mortality rate.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - Trade and Industry; Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Crimean War
9. Which TWO of the following were British inventions?
A Diesel engine
B Jet engine
C Personal computer
D Television
Correct Answer: Television, Jet engine
Explanation: The television was developed by Scotsman John Logie Baird (1888-1946) in the 1920s. In 1932 he made the first television broadcast between London and Glasgow. The jet engine was developed in Britain in the 1930s by Sir Frank Whittle (1907-96), a British Royal Air Force engineer officer.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
10. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
In 1588 the English fleet defeated a large French fleet of ships that intended to land an army in England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Elizabeth became one of the most popular monarchs in English history, particularly after 1588, when the English defeated the Spanish Armada (a large fleet of ships), which had been sent by Spain to conquer England and restore Catholicism.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A During the First World War Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister.
B During the Second World War Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister.
Correct Answer: During the Second World War Winston Churchill was the British Prime Minister.
Explanation: At this time of national crisis, Winston Churchill became Prime Minister and Britain's war leader.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
12. What did St Augustine and St Columba do during the Anglo-Saxon period?
A They invented new farming techniques.
B They were courageous warriors.
C They were early Christian missionaries
D They were leaders of an uprising in Wales
Correct Answer: They were early Christian missionaries
Explanation: Missionaries from Ireland spread the religion in the north. The most famous of these were St Patrick, who would become the patron saint of Ireland, and St Columba, who founded a monastery on the island of Iona, off the coast of what is now Scotland. St Augustine led missionaries from Rome, who spread Christianity in the south.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Anglo-Saxons
13. Who were the 'suffragettes'?
A Women who campaigned for women's votes
B Women who chose to be single
C Women who left the UK to live in India
D Women who stayed at home to raise a family
Correct Answer: Women who campaigned for women's votes
Explanation: In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an increasing number of women campaigned and demonstrated for greater rights and, in particular, the right to vote. They formed the women's suffrage movement and became known as 'suffragettes'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
We shall fight them on the beaches 'is a famous quote from a speech by Queen Elizabeth I about the Spanish Armada.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: W e shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender' Speech to the House of Commons after Dunkirk 1940
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
15. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Swinging Sixties is associated with the 1860s.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The decade of the 1960's was a period of significant social change. It was known as 'the Swinging Sixties'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
16. Which of these statements is correct?
A The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the rapid development of industry in Britain in the 20th century.
B The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the rapid development of industry that began in the 18th century.
Correct Answer: The Industrial Revolution is the name given to the rapid development of industry that began in the 18th century.
Explanation: The Industrial Revolution was the rapid development of industry in Britain in the 18th and 19th centuries.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
17. Who was given the title of Lord Protector in the 17th century?
A Isaac Newton
B King Charles II
C Oliver Cromwell
D Samuel Pepys
Correct Answer: Oliver Cromwell
Explanation: After his campaign in Ireland and victory over Charles II at Worcester, Cromwell was recognised as the leader of the new republic. He was given the title of Lord Protector and ruled until his death in 1658.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
18. What were TWO important aspects of the Reform Act of 1832?
A It abolished rotten boroughs
B It decreased the power of the monarch.
C It gave women the vote
D It increased the number of people who could vote.
Correct Answer: It increased the number of people who could vote., It abolished rotten boroughs
Explanation: The Reform Act of 1832 had greatly increased the number of people with the right to vote. The Act also abolished the old pocket and rotten boroughs.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A Florence Nightingale is associated with policing.
B Florence Nightingale is associated with the development of nursing.
Correct Answer: Florence Nightingale is associated with the development of nursing.
Explanation: In 1860 she established the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St Thomas' Hospital in London.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Crimean War
20. Which TWO are 20th-century British discoveries or inventions?
A Hovercraft
B Penicillin
C Printing press
D Radium
Correct Answer: Hovercraft, Penicillin
Explanation: Sir Christopher Cockerell (1910-99), a British inventor, invented the hovercraft in the 1950s. (Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century). Born in Scotland, Fleming moved to London as a teenager and later qualified as a doctor. He was researching influenza (the 'flu') in 1928 when he discovered penicillin.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
During the 18th century, radical new ideas about politics, philosophy and science were developed, called 'the Enlightenment'.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: During the 18th century, new ideas about politics, philosophy and science were developed. This is often called 'the Enlightenment'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Enlightenment
22. Which of these statements is correct?
A The Reform Act of 1832 increased the number of electors.
B The Reform Act of 1832 increased the power of the House of Lords.
Correct Answer: The Reform Act of 1832 increased the number of electors.
Explanation: The Reform Act of 1832 had greatly increased the number of people with the right to vote.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
23. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1830s.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The jet engine was developed in Britain in the 1930s by Sir Frank Whittle (1907-96), a British Royal Air Force engineer officer. Radar was developed by Scotsman Sir Robert Watson-Watt (1892-1973), who proposed that enemy aircraft could be detected by radio waves. The first successful radar test took place in 1935.
Reference: Chapter 3- A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
24. Which TWO changes were introduced by the Education Act of 1944?
A A clear division between primary and secondary education
B Free secondary education for all
C New public examinations
D Primary education for all
Correct Answer: Free secondary education for all, A clear division between primary and secondary education
Explanation: In this role, he oversaw the introduction of the Education Act 1944(often called 'The Butler Act'), which introduced free secondary education in England and Wales. The education system has changed significantly since the Act was introduced, but the division between primary and secondary schools that it enforced still remains in most areas of Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - The welfare state