You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. How old was Edward VI when he died?
A 15
B 18
C 35
D 56
Correct Answer: 15
Explanation: Henry VIII was succeeded by his son Edward VI, who was strongly Protestant. During his reign, the Book of Common Prayer was written to be used in the Church of England. A version of this book is still used in some churches today. Edward died at the age of 15 after ruling for just over six years, and his half-sister Mary became queen.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
2. Which of these is an accurate estimate of the number of casualties suffered by Britain in the First World War?
A 10 million
B 2 million
C 500,000
D 8 million
Correct Answer: 2 million
Explanation: Men from the West Indies, Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Canada also fought with the British. The Allies fought against the Central Powers - mainly Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire and later Bulgaria. Millions of people were killed or wounded, with more than 2 million British casualties.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious - The 20th century - The First World War
3. Which of these statements is correct?
A During the Industrial Revolution, canals were built to link the factories to cities and ports.
B During the industrial Revolution, canals were built to link the mines in the mountains with factories in the cities.
Correct Answer: During the Industrial Revolution, canals were built to link the factories to cities and ports.
Explanation: Better transport links were needed to transport raw materials and manufactured goods. Canals were built to link the factories to towns and cities and to the ports, particularly in the new industrial areas in the middle and north of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
4. Which of these statements is correct?
A Elizabeth I came to the throne when, following a long reign, her cousin Mary died.
B Elizabeth I came to the throne when, following a short reign, her half-sister Mary died.
Correct Answer: Elizabeth I came to the throne when, following a short reign, her half-sister Mary died.
Explanation: Mary was a devout Catholic and persecuted Protestants (for this reason, she became known as 'Bloody Mary'). Mary also died after a short reign and the next monarch was her half-sister, Elizabeth, the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
5. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Reformation failed in Scotland and the country remained Strongly Catholic.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Scotland had also been strongly influenced by Protestant ideas. In 1560, the predominantly Protestant Scottish Parliament abolished the authority of the Pope in Scotland and Roman Catholic religious services became illegal.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
6. Which country of the UK is not represented on the Union Flag?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Wales
Explanation: The Union Flag consists of three crosses:
-The cross of St George, patron saint of England, is a red cross on a white ground. ;
-The cross of St Andrew, patron saint of Scotland, is a diagonal white cross on a blue ground. ;
-The cross of St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, is a diagonal red cross on a white ground.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Union Flag
7. What event in 1851 took place at the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park and showed goods and exhibits from Britain and across the world?
A The Great Show
B The Great Event
C The Great Exhibition
D The Great Occasion
Correct Answer: The Great Exhibition
Explanation: The UK also became a centre for financial services, including insurance and banking. In 1851, the Great Exhibition opened in Hyde Park in the Crystal Palace, a huge building made of iron and glass. Exhibits ranged from huge machines to handmade goods. Countries from all over the world showed their goods but most of the objects were made in Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long And illustrious history - A global power - Trade and Industry
8. Which of these people was a great British playwright?
A Geoffrey Chaucer
B Sir Francis Drake
C William Caxton
D William Shakespeare
Correct Answer: William Shakespeare
Explanation: Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon, England. He was a playwright and actor and wrote many poems and plays. His most famous plays include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet.
Reference: Chapter 3: A longa and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Exploration, poetry and drama
9. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The 1950s were a time of serious unrest in Northern Ireland
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The 1970s were also a time of serious unrest in Northern Ireland.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Problems in the economy in the 1970s
10. King Edward I of England annexed Wales to the crown of England by which statute?
A The Statute of Caernarfon
B The Statute of Carmarthen
C The Statute of Gwynedd
D The Statute of Rhuddlan
Correct Answer: The Statute of Rhuddlan
Explanation: In 1284 King Edward I of England introduced the Statute of Rhuddlan, which annexed Wales to the Crown of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - War at home and abroad
11. Which of the following statements is NOT correct?
A D-Day was allied operation that attacked German forces in France by advancing through Spain.
B The attack on Normandy by Allied forces is often called D-Day.
Correct Answer: D-Day was allied operation that attacked German forces in France by advancing through Spain.
Explanation: On 6 June 1944, allied forces landed in Normandy (this event is often referred to as 'D-Day'). Following victory on the beaches of Normandy, the allied forces pressed on through France and eventually into Germany. The Allies comprehensively defeated Germany in May 1945.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
12. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Norman French influenced the development of the English language as we know today.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Middle Ages saw the development of a national culture and identity. After the Norman Conquest, the king and his noblemen had spoken Norman French and the peasants had continued to speak Anglo-Saxon. Gradually these two languages combined to become one English language.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
13. Where did the people of the Bronze Age bury their dead?
A Burial mounds
B Earth barrows
C Round barrows
D Roundhouses
Correct Answer: Round barrows
Explanation: Around 4,000 years ago, people learned to make bronze. We call this period the Bronze Age. People lived in roundhouses and buried their dead in tombs called round barrows.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain
14. Catherine Parr married Henry VIII late in his life. Who died first?
A He died first and she was a widow for the rest of her life
B He died first and she went on to remarry
C She died first and he never remarried
D She died in childbirth and Henry remarried
Correct Answer: He died first and she went on to remarry
Explanation: Catherine Parr - Catherine was a widow who married Henry late in his life. She survived him and married again but died soon after.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
15. Mary Stuart was forced to flee to England after being accused of murder. Who was she accused of murdering?
A Her brother
B Her father
C Her husband
D Her sister
Correct Answer: Her husband
Explanation: When her husband was murdered, Mary was suspected of involvement and fled to England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
16. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Lands taken from Catholics in 17th- century Ireland and given to Protestant settlers were known as 'plantations'.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: During the reigns of Elizabeth I and James I, many people in Ireland opposed rule by the Protestant government in England. There were a number of rebellions. The English government encouraged Scottish and English Protestants to settle in Ulster, the northern province of Ireland, taking over the land from Catholic landholders. These settlements were known as plantations.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Ireland
17. Charles I was unwilling to reach an agreement with Parliament. Following his defeat in the Civil War, What happened to him?
A He was Excommunicated
B He was executed
C He was exiled
D he was exonerated
Correct Answer: He was executed
Explanation: The king's army was defeated at the Battles of Marston Moore and Naseby. By 1646, it was clear that Parliament had won the war. Charles was held prisoner by the parliamentary army. He was still unwilling to reach any agreement with Parliament and in 1649 he was executed.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
18. The last successful foreign invasion of England was by which of the following?
A The Normans led by William
B The Romans led by Emperor Claudius
C The Romans led by Julius Caesar
D The Vikings
Correct Answer: The Normans led by William
Explanation: The Norman Conquest was the last successful foreign invasion of England and led to many changes in government and social structures in England. Norman French, the language of the new ruling class, influenced the development of the English language as we know it today.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Norman Conquest
19. During the reign of Henry VIII, which country of the union became formally united with England?
A Ireland
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Wales
Explanation: During the reign of Henry VIII, Wales became formally united with England by the Act for the Government of Wales. The Welsh sent representatives to the House of Commons and the Welsh legal system was reformed.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
20. An attempt by which group to put James II's son on the throne instead of George I was quickly defeated?
A English Puritans
B French Huguenots
C Irish Catholics
D Scottish Jacobites
Correct Answer: Scottish Jacobites
Explanation: When Queen Anne died in 1714, Parliament chose a German, George I, to be the next king, because he was Anne's nearest Protestant relative. An attempt by Scottish Jacobites to put James II's son on the throne instead was quickly defeated.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Prime minister
21. Scotland changed in which TWO ways after Battle of Culloden?
A Chieftains became landlords if they had the favour of the English king
B Chieftains took control of the land away from the English king
C Clansmen became tenants who had to pay for the land they used
D The clans were entirely destroyed
Correct Answer: Chieftains became landlords if they had the favour of the English king, Clansmen became tenants who had to pay for the land they used
Explanation: The clans lost a lot of their power and influence after Culloden. Chieftains became landlords if they had the favour of the English king, and clansmen became tenants who had to pay for the Land they used.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The rebellion of the clans
22. Sake Dean Mahomet opened which establishment in George Street, London in 1810?
A Hindustan Coffee House
B Mahomet Coffee House
C Mahomet Shampoo Parlour
D Pakistan Curry House
Correct Answer: Hindustan Coffee House
Explanation: Mahomet was born in 1759 and grew up in the Bengal region of India. He served in the Bengal army and came to Britain in 1782. He then moved to Ireland and eloped with an Irish girl called Jane Daly in 1786, returning to England at the turn of the century. In 1810 he opened the Hindustan Coffee House in George Street, London. It was the first curry house to open in Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
23. Which of these countries did not fight on the side of the Allied Powers during the First World War?
A Bulgaria
B Italy
C Serbia
D US
Correct Answer: Bulgaria
Explanation: The Allies fought against the Central Powers - mainly Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire and later Bulgaria.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The First World War
24. Who did William the Conqueror defeat at the Battle of Hastings in 1066?
A Boudicca
B Kenneth MacAlpin
C Kin Cnut
D King Harold
Correct Answer: King Harold
Explanation: In 1066, an invasion led by William, the Duke of Normandy (in what is now northern France), defeated Harold, the Saxon king of England, at the Battle of Hastings. Harold was killed in the battle. William became king of England and is known as William the Conqueror.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Norman Conquest