You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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1. Which famous leader said the following:'We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the street, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender'?
A Admiral Nelson
B Clement Attlee
C Oliver Cromwell
D Winston Churchill
Correct Answer: Winston Churchill
Explanation: Churchill was the son of a politician and, before becoming a Conservative MP in 1900, was a soldier and journalist. In May 1940 he became Prime Minister. During the War, he made many famous speeches including lines which you may still hear: I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat' Churchill's first speech to the House of Commons after he became Prime Minister, 1940; 'We shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender' Speech to the House of Commons after Dunkirk (see below), 1940
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
2. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
By around AD 600, Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were established in Britain.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Roman army left Britain in AD 410 to defend other parts of the Roman Empire and never returned. Britain was again invaded by tribes from northern Europe: the Jute's, the Angles and the Saxons. The languages they spoke are the basis of modern-day English. Battles were fought against these invaders but, by about AD 600, Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were established in Britain. These kingdoms were mainly in what is now England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Anglo-Saxons
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Sir Robert Walpole was Prime Minister from 1700-1730.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The most important minister in Parliament became known as the Prime Minister. The first man to be called this was Sir Robert Walpole, who was Prime Minister from 1721 to 1742.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Prime Minister
4. Which of these statements is correct?
A The 'Divine Right of Kings' was the view held by many English monarchs that they could seize lands belonging to the nobility as they wished.
B The 'Divine Rights of Kings' was the view held by many English monarchs that they were directly appointed by God to rule.
Correct Answer: The 'Divine Rights of Kings' was the view held by many English monarchs that they were directly appointed by God to rule.
Explanation: James I and his son Charles I were less skilled politically. Both believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings': the idea that the king was directly appointed by God to rule. They thought that the king should be able to act without having to seek approval from Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The rise of Parliament
5. Who was James II's eldest daughter, Mary, married to?
A She never married
B The Duke of York
C The French Dauphin
D William of Orange
Correct Answer: William of Orange
Explanation: James II's elder daughter, Mary, was married to her cousin William of Orange, the Protestant ruler of the Netherlands.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Glorious Revolution
6. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Commercial expansion and prosperity of the 19th century were sustained in part by the booming slave trade.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: This commercial expansion and prosperity was sustained in part by the booming slave trade. While slavery was illegal within Britain itself, by the 18th century it was a fully established overseas industry, dominated by Britain and the American colonies.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The slave trade
7. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Richard Arkwright developed horse-driven spinning mills that used only one machine, increasing efficiency and production.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Born in 1732, Arkwright originally trained and worked as a barber. He was able to dye hair and make wigs. When wigs became less popular, he started to work in textiles. He improved the original carding machine. Carding is the process of preparing fibres for spinning into yarn and fabric. He also developed horse-driven spinning mills that used only one machine. This increased the efficiency of production. Later, he used the steam engine to power machinery. Arkwright is particularly remembered for the efficient and profitable way that he ran his factories.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
8. Which of these statements is correct?
A After the Black Death, there were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages.
B The Black Death destroyed cereal crops, leading to a famine that killed many peasants.
Correct Answer: After the Black Death, there were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages.
Explanation: Following the Black Death, the smaller population meant there was less need to grow cereal crops. There were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages. New social classes appeared, including owners of large areas of land (later called the gentry), and people left the countryside to live in the towns. In the towns, growing wealth led to the development of a strong middle class.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Black Death
9. After the Act of Union, Scotland was no longer an independent country. In what ways was is it still separate from the rest of Great Britain?
A All of the above
B It kept its own Presbyterian church
C It kept its own educational system
D It kept its own legal system
Correct Answer: All of the above
Explanation: The Act of Union, known as the Treaty of Union in Scotland, was therefore agreed in 1707, creating the Kingdom of Great Britain. Although Scotland was no longer an Independent country, it kept its own legal and education systems and Presbyterian Church.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power- The Act or Treaty of Union in Scotland
10. Where did Florence Nightingale establish the Nightingale School for Nurses in 1860?
A Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge
B Prince Philip Hospital, Llanelli
C St James's University Hospital, Leeds
D St Thomas' Hospital, London
Correct Answer: St Thomas' Hospital, London
Explanation: In 1860 she established the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St Thomas' Hospital in London. The school was the first of its kind and still exists today, as do many of the practices that Florence used. She is often regarded as the founder of modern nursing.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Crimean War
11. After his campaign in Ireland and his defeat of Charles II, Oliver Cromwell was given what title?
A Chieftain
B King
C Lord Lieutenant
D Lord Protector
Correct Answer: Lord Protector
Explanation: After his campaign in Ireland and victory over Charles II at Worcester, Cromwell was recognised as the leader of the new republic. He was given the title of Lord Protector and ruled until his death in 1658. When Cromwell died, his son, Richard, became Lord Protector in his place but was not able to control the army or the government.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
12. Which of these statements is correct?
A The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1930's
B The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1950's.
Correct Answer: The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1930's
Explanation: Radar was developed by Scotsman Sir Robert Watson-Watt (1892-1973), who proposed that enemy aircraft could be detected by radio waves. The first successful radar test took place in 1935. The jet engine was developed in Britain in the 1930s by Sir Frank Whittle (1907-96), a British Royal Air Force engineer officer.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
13. Britain was brought into conflict with which country during the 19th century, because they were expanding and trading in similar areas?
A France
B Germany
C Spain
D The Netherlands
Correct Answer: France
Explanation: Trading and settlements overseas sometimes brought Britain into conflict with other countries, particularly France, which was expanding and trading in a similar way in many of the same areas of the world.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Puritans agreed with the religious reforms of the Church of England introduced by Charles I.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Charles I wanted the worship of the Church of England to include more ceremony and introduced a revised Prayer Book. He tried to impose this Prayer Book on the Presbyterian Church in Scotland and this led to serious unrest. A Scottish army was formed and Charles could not find the money he needed for his own army without the help of Parliament. In 1640, he recalled Parliament to ask it for funds. Many in Parliament were Puritans, a group of Protestants who advocated strict and simple religious doctrine and worship. They did not agree with the king's religious views and disliked his reforms of the Church of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The beginning of the English Civil War
15. Which TWO of the following were members of the Royal Society?
A Samuel Pepys
B Sir Christopher Wren
C Sir Edmond Halley
D Sir Isaac Newton
Correct Answer: Sir Isaac Newton, Sir Edmond Halley
Explanation: Charles II was interested in science. During his reign, the Royal Society was formed to promote 'natural knowledge'. This is the oldest surviving scientific society in the world. Among its early members were Sir Edmund Halley, who successfully predicted the return of the comet now called Halley's Comet, and Sir Isaac Newton.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Restoration
16. What was the main source of employment in the UK before the Industrial Revolution?
A Agriculture
B Canal building
C Financial services
D The wool trade
Correct Answer: Agriculture
Explanation: Before the 18th century, agriculture was the biggest source of employment in Britain. There were many cottage industries, where people worked from home to produce goods such as cloth and lace.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
17. During the 1960s, Parliament passed new laws that made it illegal for employers to discriminate against women because of their gender and gave them which right?
A Childcare at work
B Equal pay
C Free lunches
D Two year's maternity leave
Correct Answer: Equal pay
Explanation: It was quite common at the time for employers to ask women to leave their jobs when they got married, but Parliament passed new laws giving women the right to equal pay and made it illegal for employers to discriminate against women because of their gender.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
18. The Wars of the Roses was fought by the supporters of which TWO families in order to decide who should be King of England?
A The House of Lancaster
B The House of Tudor
C The House of Windsor
D The House of York
Correct Answer: The House of York, The House of Lancaster
Explanation: In 1455, a civil war was begun to decide who should be king of England. It was fought between the supporters of two families: the House of Lancaster and the House of York. This war was called the Wars of the Roses, because the symbol of Lancaster was a red rose and the symbol of York was a white rose.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Wars of the Roses
19. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Under the system of feudalism, the kings gave land to lords, and the landowners had to send men to serve in the army in return.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Normans used a system of land ownership known as feudalism. The king gave land to his lords in return for help in war. Landowners had to send certain numbers of men to serve in the army.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Black Death
20. In 1649, England was declared a republic. What was it called?
A European wealth
B Great Britain
C The Commonwealth
D The People's Republic
Correct Answer: The Commonwealth
Explanation: The king's army was defeated at the Battles of Marston Moore and Naseby. By 1646, it was clear that Parliament had won the war. Charles was held prisoner by the parliamentary army. He was still unwilling to reach any agreement with Parliament and in 1649 he was executed. England declared itself a republic, called the Commonwealth. It no longer had a monarch.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
21. Who or what were the 'clans'?
A English lords
B Prominent families in England and Wales
C Prominent families in Scotland and Ireland
D Welsh landowners
Correct Answer: Prominent families in Scotland and Ireland
Explanation: In the north of Scotland and Ireland, land was owned by members of the 'clans' (prominent families).
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Black Death
22. In 1948 Aneurin (Nye) Bevan led the establishment of the National Health Service (NHS). What was his role at the time?
A Deputy Prime Minister
B Home secretary
C Minister for Health
D Minister for Social Security
Correct Answer: Minister for Health
Explanation: In 1948, Aneurin (Nye) Bevan, the Minister for Health, led the establishment of the National Health Service (NHS), which guaranteed a minimum standard of health care for all, free at the point of use. A national system of benefits was also introduced to provide 'social security', so that the population would be protected from the 'cradle to the grave'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - The welfare state
23. Who were Elizabeth I's parents?
A Henry VII and Elizabeth of York
B Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn
C Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon
D Henry VIII and Jane Seymour
Correct Answer: Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn
Explanation: Mary was a devout Catholic and persecuted Protestants (for this reason, she became known as 'Bloody Mary'). Mary also died after a short reign and the next monarch was her half-sister, Elizabeth, the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
24. Which Catherine was executed after being accused of taking lovers by Henry VIII?
A Boleyn
B Howard
C Of Aragon
D Parr
Correct Answer: Howard
Explanation: Catherine Howard - Catherine was a cousin of Anne Boleyn. She was also accused of taking lovers and executed.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts