You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. St Andrew is the patron of which country?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Scotland
Explanation: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each have a national saint, called a patron saint. Each saint has a special day:
-1 March: St David's Day, Wales ;
-17 March: St Patrick's Day, Northern Ireland ;
-23 April. St George's Day, England ;
-30 November: St Andrew's Day, Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
2. At which festival are mince pies traditionally eaten?
A Christmas
B Diwali
C Easter
D Vaisakhi
Correct Answer: Christmas
Explanation: Christmas is celebrated in a traditional way. People usually spend the day at home and eat a special meal, which often includes roast turkey, Christmas pudding and mince pies.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - The main Christian festivals
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Thomas Hardy is a famous author who wrote Far from the Madding Crowd.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) was an author and poet. His best-known novels focus on rural society and include Far from the Madding Crowd and Jude the Obscure.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
4. What do Sir William Golding, Seamus Heaney and Harold Pinter have in common?
A They are all famous British athletes
B They have all been Prime Minister
C They have all been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
D They were part of the first British expedition to the North Pole.
Correct Answer: They have all been awarded the Nobel Prize for literature.
Explanation: Several British writers, including the novelist Sir William Golding, the poet Seamus Heaney, and the playwright Harold Pinter, have won the Nobel Prize in Literature.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature
5. Which of these statements is correct?
A Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous film actor who has won several BAFTAs.
B Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous rower who won gold medals in five consecutive Olympics Games.
Correct Answer: Sir Steve Redgrave is a famous rower who won gold medals in five consecutive Olympics Games.
Explanation: Sir Steve Redgrave (1962-) won gold medals in rowing in five consecutive Olympic Games and is one of Britain's greatest Olympians.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Notable British sportsmen and women
6. Which of the following are major outdoor music festivals?
A Glastonbury
B Hogmanay
C Isle of Wight Festival
D Royal Ascot
Correct Answer: Glastonbury
Explanation: Famous festivals include Glastonbury, the Isle of Wight Festival and the V Festival. Many bands and solo artists, both well-known and up-and-coming, perform at these events.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Music
7. Which TWO Patron saints' days occur in March?
A St Andrew
B St David
C St George
D St Patrick
Correct Answer: St David, St Patrick
Explanation: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each have a national saint, called a patron saint. Each saint has a special day:
-1 March: St David's Day, Wales ;
-17 March: St Patrick's Day, Northern Ireland ;
-23 April. St George's Day, England ;
-30 November: St Andrew's Day, Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
8. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
John Constable (1776 -1837) founded the modern police force in England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: John Constable (1776-1837) was a landscape painter most famous for his works of Dedham Vale on the Suffolk-Essex border in the east of England.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art - Notable British artists
9. On which date is St Patrick's Day celebrated?
A 1 March
B 17 March
C 23 April
D 30 November
Correct Answer: 17 March
Explanation: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland each have a national saint, called a patron saint. Each saint has a special day:
-1 March: St David's Day, Wales ;
-17 March: St Patrick's Day, Northern Ireland ;
-23 April. St George's Day, England ;
-30 November: St Andrew's Day, Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religeon - Patron saints' days
10. What celebration takes place each year on 14 February?
A Bonfire Night
B Halloween
C Hogmanay
D Valentine's Day
Correct Answer: Valentine's Day
Explanation: Valentine's Day, 14 February, is when lovers exchange cards and gifts. Sometimes people send anonymous cards to someone they secretly admire.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and traditions
11. What task is associated with National Trust?
A Conversing deep water fish
B Conversing native bird species
C Preserving important buildings and places
D Preserving old aircraft
Correct Answer: Preserving important buildings and places
Explanation: Both are charities that work to preserve important buildings, coastline and countryside in the UK.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest
12. Which of these statements is correct?
A Andy Murray is the first British man to sail around the world.
B Andy Murray is the first British man to win a singles tennis title in a Grand Slam tournament since 1936.
Correct Answer: Andy Murray is the first British man to win a singles tennis title in a Grand Slam tournament since 1936.
Explanation: He is the first British man to win a singles title in a Grand Slam tournament since 1936. In the same year, he won Olympic gold and silver medals and was runner-up in the men's singles at Wimbledon.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Notable British sportsmen and women
13. Which of these statements is correct?
A Rugby originated in England in the early 19th century.
B Rugby was introduced to ancient Britain by Viking invaders.
Correct Answer: Rugby originated in England in the early 19th century.
Explanation: Rugby originated in England in the early 19th century and is very popular in the UK today.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Rugby
14. Which TWO foods are associated with England?
A Fish and chips
B Haggis
C Roast beef
D Ulster fry
Correct Answer: Fish and chips, Roast beef
Explanation: There are a variety of foods that are traditionally associated with different parts of the UK:
-England: Roast beef, which is served with potatoes, vegetables, Yorkshire puddings (batter that is baked in the oven) and other accompaniments. Fish and chips are also popular.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Cooking and food - Traditional foods
15. Which of these statements is correct?
A National parks are areas of protected countryside that everyone can visit.
B National parks are national sports grounds for people to hold sporting events.
Correct Answer: National parks are areas of protected countryside that everyone can visit.
Explanation: They are areas of protected countryside that everyone can visit, and where people live, work and look after the landscape.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest
16. What is the capital city of Wales?
A Belfast
B Cardiff
C Edinburgh
D Swansea
Correct Answer: Cardiff
Explanation: Wales, The capital city of Wales is Cardiff
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
17. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The 40 days before Easter are known as Lent.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The 40 days before Easter are known as Lent.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and Traditions - The main Christian festivals
18. Which of the following UK landmarks is in Northern Ireland?
A Big Ben
B Snowdonia
C The Eden Project
D The Giants Causeway
Correct Answer: The Giants Causeway
Explanation: Located on the north-east coast of Northern Ireland, the Giant's Causeway is a land formation of columns made from volcanic lava. It was formed about 50 million years ago. There are many legends about the Causeway and how it was formed.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
19. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Mo Farah and Jessica Ennis are well-known athletes who won gold medals at the 2012 London Olympics.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Jessica Ennis (1980-) is an athlete. She won the 2012 Olympic gold medal in the heptathlon, which includes seven different track and field events. She also holds a number of British athletics records. Mo Farah (1983-) is a British distance runner, born in Somalia. He won gold medals in the 2012 Olympics for the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and is the first Briton to win the Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 metres.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Notable British sportsmen and women
20. Which artist is considered to be the one who raised the profile of landscape painting?
A David Allan
B John Constable
C Joseph Turner
D Thomas Gainsborough
Correct Answer: Joseph Turner
Explanation: Joseph Turner (1775-1851) was an influential landscape painter in a modern style. He is considered the artist who raised the profile of landscape painting.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art - Notable British artists
21. Which TWO of the following are UK landmarks?
A Edinburgh Castle
B National Trust
C The Eisteddfod
D The London Eye
Correct Answer: The London Eye, Edinburgh Castle
Explanation: The London Eye is situated on the southern bank of the River Thames and is a Ferris wheel that is 443 feet (135 metres) tall. The Castle is a dominant feature of the skyline in Edinburgh, Scotland. It has a long history, dating back to the early Middle Ages.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
22. Which of these statements is correct?
A The first professional UK football clubs were formed in 1066
B The first professional UK football clubs were formed in the late 19th century.
Correct Answer: The first professional UK football clubs were formed in the late 19th century.
Explanation: Football is the UK's most popular sport. It has a long history in the UK and the first professional football clubs were formed in the late 19th century.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Football
23. Which TWO are famous gardens in the UK?
A Bodnant Garden
B London eye
C Sissinghurst
D Snowdonia
Correct Answer: Sissinghurst, Bodnant Garden
Explanation: There are famous gardens to visit throughout the UK, including Kew Gardens, Sissinghurst and Hidcote in England,Crathes Castle and Inveraray Castle in Scotland, Bodnant Garden in Wales, and Mount Stewart in Northern Ireland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Gardening
24. Which TWO people are famous UK sports stars?
A Dame Kelly Holmes
B Jane Austen
C Lucien Freud
D Sir Chris Hoy
Correct Answer: Sir Chris Hoy, Dame Kelly Holmes
Explanation: Sir Chris Hoy (1976-) is a Scottish cyclist who has won six gold and one silver Olympic medals. He has also won 11 world championship titles. ; Dame Kelly Holmes (1970-) won two gold medals for running in the 2004 Olympic Games. She has held a number of British and European records.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Notable British sportsmen and women