You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. What event is commemorated on 5 November every year?
A A plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament
B England's Worlds Cup victory of 1966
C The Queen's birthday
D The end of the First World War
Correct Answer: A plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament
Explanation: Bonfire Night, 5 November, is an occasion when people in Great Britain set off fireworks at home or in special displays. The origin of this celebration was an event in 1605, when a group of Catholics led by Guy Fawkes failed in their plan to kill the Protestant king with a bomb in the Houses of Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and traditions
2. Ian McEwan, Hilary Mantel and Julian Barnes have all won which literacy prize?
A The Man Booker Prize
B The Mercury Prize
C The Nobel Prize in Literature
D The Turner Prize
Correct Answer: The Man Booker Prize
Explanation: The Man Booker Prize for Fiction is awarded annually for the best fiction novel written by an author from the Commonwealth, Ireland or Zimbabwe. It has been awarded since 1968. Past winners include Ian McEwan, Hilary Mantel and Julian Barnes.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Mo Farah was the first person to sail around the world single-handed.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Mo Farah (1983-) is a British distance runner, born in Somalia. He won gold medals in the 2012 Olympics for the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and is the first Briton to win the Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 metres.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Notable British sportsmen and women
4. Eid al-Fitr celebrates the end of Ramadan. For how long before do Muslims fast?
A Five days
B One month
C Twenty-one days
D Two weeks
Correct Answer: One month
Explanation: Eid al-Fitr celebrates the end of Ramadan, when Muslims have fasted for a month. They thank Allah for giving them the strength to complete the fast. The date when it takes place changes every year. Muslims attend special services and meals.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other religious festivals
5. Is this statement TRUE or FALSE? There are now more women in high-level positions than ever before.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Employment opportunities for women are much greater than they were in the past. Women work in all sectors of the economy, and there are now more women in high-level positions than ever before, including senior managers in traditionally male-dominated occupations. Alongside this, men now work in more varied jobs than they did in the past.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Ethnic diversity
6. Diwali is a religious celebration for which TWO religious groups?
A Hindus
B Jews
C Muslims
D Sikh
Correct Answer: Sikh, Hindus
Explanation: Diwali normally falls in October or November and lasts for five days. It is often called the Festival of Lights. It is celebrated by Hindus and Sikhs. It celebrates the victory of good over evil and the gaining of knowledge. There are different stories about how the festival came about. There is a famous celebration of Diwali in Leicester.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other religious festivals
7. What is the capital city of the UK?
A Birmingham
B Liverpool
C London
D Sheffield
Correct Answer: London
Explanation: The capital city of the UK is London
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
8. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
You have to be 16 or over to buy a drink in a public house (pub) or nightclub.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: To buy alcohol in a pub or night club you must be 18 or over, but people under that age may be allowed in some pubs with an adult. When they are 16, people can drink wine or beer with a meal in a hotel or restaurant (including eating areas in pubs) as long as they are with someone over 18.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Pubs and night clubs
9. Which of these statements is correct?
A A dog's owner is not responsible for keeping the animal under control and cleaning up after it in public places.
B A dog's owner is responsible for keeping the animal under control and cleaning up after it in public places.
Correct Answer: A dog's owner is responsible for keeping the animal under control and cleaning up after it in public places.
Explanation: A lot of people in the UK have pets such as cats or dogs. They might have them for company or because they enjoy looking after them. It is against the law to treat a pet cruelly or to neglect it. All dogs in public places must wear a collar showing the name and address of the owner. The owner is responsible for keeping the dog under control and for cleaning up after the animal in a public place.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Pets
10. The national Eisteddfod is a major cultural festival that takes place in which country?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Wales
Explanation: The National Eisteddfod of Wales is an annual cultural festival which includes music, dance, art and original performances largely in Welsh. It includes a number of important competitions for Welsh poetry.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Music
11. Which of the following takes place on 14 February every year?
A All Saints Day
B St Christopher's Day
C St George's Day
D St Valentine's Day
Correct Answer: St Valentine's Day
Explanation: Valentine's Day, 14 February, is when lovers exchange cards and gifts. Sometimes people send anonymous cards to someone they secretly admire.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and traditions
12. The British equivalent of the Oscars is hosted by BAFTA. For what do these initials stand?
A British Academy of Film and Television Arts
B British Academy of Film and Theatre Awards
C British Association of Film and Technical Appliances
D British Awards for Film and Televisions Actors
Correct Answer: British Academy of Film and Television Arts
Explanation: The annual British Academy Film Awards, hosted by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), are the British equivalent of the Oscars.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry
13. Which of these statements is correct?
A All the national saints' days are celebrated but only in England and Wales are they official holidays.
B All the patron saints' days are celebrated but only in Scotland and Northern Ireland are they official holidays.
Correct Answer: All the patron saints' days are celebrated but only in Scotland and Northern Ireland are they official holidays.
Explanation: Only Scotland and Northern Ireland have their patron saint's day as an official holiday (although in Scotland not all businesses and offices will dose).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Patron saints' days
14. A snack made from flour, dried fruits and spices and served either hot or cold is which of the following?
A A Scottish bun
B A Welsh cake
C An English muffin
D An Irish pie
Correct Answer: A Welsh cake
Explanation: Wales: Welsh cakes - a traditional Welsh snack made from flour, dried fruits and spices, and served either hot or cold.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Cooking food - Traditional foods
15. Which organisation was founded in 1895 and now has over 61,000 volunteers helping to preserve important buildings, the countryside and the coastline?
A Country Landowners Association
B The Countryside Alliance
C The National Gardens Scheme
D The National Trust
Correct Answer: The National Trust
Explanation: The National Trust was founded in 1895 by three volunteers. There are now more than 61,000 volunteers helping to keep the organisation running.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest
16. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Jane Austen and Charles Dickens were both famous sculptors.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English novelist. Her books include Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. Her novels are concerned with marriage and family relationships. Many have been made into television programmes or films. ; Charles Dickens (1812-70) wrote a number of very famous novels, including Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. You will hear references in everyday talk to some of the characters in his books, such as Scrooge (a mean person) or Mr Micawber (always hopeful).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
17. Sir Anthony Van Dyck was famous as which of the following?
A Actor
B Composer
C Painter
D Sculptor
Correct Answer: Painter
Explanation: Many of the painters working in Britain in the 18th and 17th centuries were from abroad - for example, Hans Holbein and Sir Anthony Van Dyck. British artists, particularly those painting portraits and landscapes, became well known from the 18th century onwards.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art
18. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Sir Ian Botham captained the England rugby team.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Sir Ian Botham (1955- ) captained the English cricket team and holds a number of English Test cricket records, both for batting and for bowling.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Notable British sportsmen and women
19. Which of the following is a famous British film?
A Passport to Paddington
B Passport to Panama
C Passport to Pimlico
D Passport to Portsmouth
Correct Answer: Passport to Pimlico
Explanation: The 1950s and 1960s were a high point for British comedies, including Passport to Pimlico, The Ladykillers and, later, the Carry On films.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry
20. What is the name of the famous horse race held in Liverpool?
A Grand Chase
B Grand Derby
C Grand National
D Steeplechase
Correct Answer: Grand National
Explanation: Famous horse-racing events include: Royal Ascot, a five-day race meeting in Berkshire attended by members of the Royal Family; the Grand National at Aintree near Liverpool; and the Scottish Grand National at Ayr.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Horse racing
21. Who wrote the poem The Tyger?
A William Blake
B William Shakespeare
C William Wallace
D William Wordsworth
Correct Answer: William Blake
Explanation: Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright, In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry?' (William Blake, 1757-1827 - The Tyger)
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - literature - British poets
22. Which Hindu and Sikh festival is normally celebrated in October or November every year?
A Diwali
B Eid ul Adha
C Hanukkah
D Vaisakhi
Correct Answer: Diwali
Explanation: Diwali normally falls in October or November and lasts for five days. It is often called the Festival of Lights. It is celebrated by Hindus and Sikhs. It celebrates the victory of good over evil and the gaining of knowledge. There are different stories about how the festival came about. There is a famous celebration of Diwali in Leicester.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other religious festivals
23. Which of these books did Graham Greene not write?
A Brighton Rock
B Moby Dick
C The Heart of the Matter
D The Honorary Consul
Correct Answer: Moby Dick
Explanation: Graham Greene (1904-91) wrote novels often influenced by his religious beliefs, including The Heart of the Matter, The Honorary Consul, Brighton Rock and Our Man in Havana.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
24. What is Ridley Scott famous for?
A Conducting orchestras
B Directing films
C Singing as an operatic
D Theatre production
Correct Answer: Directing films
Explanation: British studios flourished in the 1930s. Eminent directors included Sir Alexander Korda and Sir Alfred Hitchcock, who later left for Hollywood and remained an important film director until his death in 1980. During the Second World War, British movies (for example, In Which We Serve) played an important part in boosting morale. Later, British directors including Sir David Lean and Ridley Scott found great success both in the UK and internationally.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry