You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Which is an aim of the United Nations?
A To create a single free trade market
B To examine decisions made by the European Union
C To prevent war and promote international peace and security
D To promote dictatorship
Correct Answer: To prevent war and promote international peace and security
Explanation: The UN was set up after the Second World War and aims to prevent war and promote international peace and security. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The United Nations
2. Which TWO are political parties in the UK?
A Conservatives party
B Labour party
C Modern party
D Office party
Correct Answer: Labour party, Conservatives party
Explanation: Anyone aged 18 or over can stand for election as an MP but they are unlikely to win unless they have been nominated to represent one of the major political parties. These are the Conservative Party, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats, or one of the parties representing Scottish, Welsh or Northern Irish interests. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The party system
3. The UK joined which international organisation in 1973?
A NATO
B The Commonwealth
C The EU
D The European Commission
Correct Answer: The EU
Explanation: The UK joined the EU (or the EEC as it was known at the time) on 1 January 1973.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The United Nations
4. What must you have done in order to vote in elections?
A Paid income tax in the previous year
B Passed an electoral test
C Put your name on the electoral register
D Registered your identity with the police
Correct Answer: Put your name on the electoral register
Explanation: To be able to vote in a parliamentary, local or European election, you must have your name on the electoral register. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Who can vote? - The electoral register
5. Which TWO chambers form the UK Parliament?
A House of Commons
B House of Fraser
C House of Lords
D House of Representatives
Correct Answer: House of Commons, House of Lords
Explanation: In the UK, there are several different parts of government. The main ones are:
- the monarchy ;
- Parliament (the House of Commons and the House of Lords)
Reference: Chapter 5: the UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - Constitutional institutions
6. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Members of the public are allowed to attend Youth Court hearings.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Members of the public are not allowed In Youth Courts, and the name or photographs of the accused young person cannot be published in newspapers or used by the media.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts - Youth Courts
7. What important change to our voting rights took place in 1969? 
A Compulsory voting was introduced
B Prisoners were given the vote
C The voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women
D Women over 35 were given the vote
Correct Answer: The voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women
Explanation: In 1969, the voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The development of British democracy
8. At what age can you vote in a General Election in the UK?
A 16
B 18
C 21
D 23
Correct Answer: 18
Explanation: The present voting age of 18 was set in 1969 and (with a few exceptions) all UK-born and naturalised adult citizens have the right to vote. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Who can vote?
9. How are local councils funded?
A From central government and local taxes
B From local businesses
C Through donations from local people
D Through money raised from local fundraising events
Correct Answer: From central government and local taxes
Explanation: They are funded by money from central government and by local taxes. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Local government
10. Why is 1918 an important date in the history of Women's rights?
A Equal pay laws were passed
B The first divorce laws were introduced
C Women were given the right to vote
D Women were made legally responsible for their child.
Correct Answer: Women were given the right to vote
Explanation: However, by 1918 most of these reforms had been adopted. The voting franchise was also extended to women over 30, and then in 1928 to men and women over 21. In 1969, the voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The development of British democracy
11. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The National Citizen Service provides military training to young people.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: These include the National Citizen Service programme, which gives 16- and 17-year-olds the opportunity to enjoy outdoor activities, develop their skills and take part in a community project. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Other ways to volunteer
12. Which of these statements is correct?
A Volunteering is a good way to earn additional money.
B Volunteering is a way of helping others without receiving payment.
Correct Answer: Volunteering is a way of helping others without receiving payment.
Explanation: Volunteering is working for good causes without payment.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Other ways to volunteer
13. Which TWO are examples of Civil law?
A Carrying a weapon
B Discrimination in the Workplace
C Disputes between landlords and tenants
D Selling tobacco
Correct Answer: Disputes between landlords and tenants, Discrimination in the Workplace
Explanation: Examples of civil laws are:
- Housing law: this includes disputes between landlords and tenants over issues such as repairs and eviction. ;
- Consumer rights: an example of this is a dispute about faulty goods or services. ;
- Employment law: these cases include disputes over wages and cases of unfair dismissal or discrimination in the workplace. ;
- Debt: people might be taken to court if they owe money to someone.
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The law in the UK
14. Which TWO are members of the Parliament (MPs) responsible for?
A Representing everyone in their constituency
B Representing only those who voted for them
C Scruitanising and commenting on what the government is doing
D Supporting the government on all decisions and laws
Correct Answer: Representing everyone in their constituency, Scruitanising and commenting on what the government is doing
Explanation: MPs have a number of different responsibilities. They
-represent everyone in their constituency ;
-help to create new laws ; ;
-scrutinise and comment on what the government is doing ;
-debate important national issues.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - The House of Commons
15. Which of these statements is correct?
A Self-employed people can ask a friend to pay their National Insurance Contribution on their behalf.
B Self-employed people need to pay National Insurance Contributions themselves.
Correct Answer: Self-employed people need to pay National Insurance Contributions themselves.
Explanation: People who are self-employed need to pay National Insurance Contributions themselves.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - National Insurance
16. Which of these statements is correct?
A The small claims procedure helps people to make small home insurance claims.
B The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people to settle minor disputes.
Correct Answer: The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people to settle minor disputes.
Explanation: The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people to settle minor disputes without spending a lot of time and money using a lawyer. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Civil courts - The small claims procedure
17. In 1999 which TWO new national bodies were established?
A English Parliament
B Houses of Lords
C Scottish Parliament
D Welsh Assembly
Correct Answer: Scottish Parliament, Welsh Assembly
Explanation: There has been a Welsh Assembly and a Scottish Parliament since 1999. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations
18. Which of these statements is correct?
A If your driving licence is from a country in the European Union you can drive in the UK for as long as your license is valid.
B If your driving licence is from a country in the European Union you have to apply for a UK licence in order to drive.
Correct Answer: If your driving licence is from a country in the European Union you can drive in the UK for as long as your license is valid.
Explanation: If your driving licence is from a country in the European Union (EU), Iceland, Liechtenstein or Norway, you can drive in the UK for as long as your licence is valid. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Driving
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A Countries are obliged to belong to the Commonwealth.
B Countries join the Commonwealth voluntarily.
Correct Answer: Countries join the Commonwealth voluntarily.
Explanation: The Commonwealth is an association of countries that support each other and work together towards shared goals in democracy and development. Most member states were once part of the British Empire, although a few countries which were not have also joined. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The Commonwealth
20. How often does Prime Ministers questions occur when Parliament is sitting?
A Every day
B Once a month
C Once a week
D Twice a week
Correct Answer: Once a week
Explanation: One important opportunity to do this is at Prime Minister's Questions, which takes place every week while Parliament is sitting. 
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The opposition
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
 The Scottish Parliament can pass legislation for Scotland on all matters.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The Scottish Parliament can pass laws for Scotland on all matters which are not specifically reserved to the UK Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations - The Scottish Parliament
22. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The British constitute is contained in a single written document.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The British constitution is not written down in any single document, and therefore it is described as 'unwritten'.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution
23. In 1999, what happened to hereditary peers in the House of Lords?
A Their numbers were greatly increased.
B Their salaries were stopped
C They lost their automatic right to attend the House of Lords
D Women were allowed to inherit their titles
Correct Answer: They lost their automatic right to attend the House of Lords
Explanation: Since 1999, hereditary peers have lost the automatic right to attend the House of Lords. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government -The House of Lords
24. Which TWO of the following do pressure and lobby groups do?
A Assist MP's in their constituency work
B Influence government policy
C Organise violent protests
D Represent the views of British businesses
Correct Answer: Represent the views of British businesses, Influence government policy
Explanation: Pressure and lobby groups are organisations which try to influence government policy. They play an important role in politics. Some are representative organisations such as the CBI (Confederation of British Industry), which represents the views of British business.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The party system