You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Police forces are headed by whom?
A Chief Constables
B Generals
C Mayors
D Ministers
Correct Answer: Chief Constables
Explanation: The police are organised into a number of separate police forces headed by Chief Constables. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The police and their duties
2. When is a by-election for a parliamentary seat held?
A Every two years
B Half-way through a parliamentary term
C When a member of Parliament (MP) dies or resigns
D When the Prime Minister decides to call one
Correct Answer: When a member of Parliament (MP) dies or resigns
Explanation: If an MP dies or resigns, there will be a fresh election, called a by-election, in his or her constituency. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - Elections
3. The Chancellor of the Exchequer is responsible for which area of government policy?
A Economy
B Education
C Health
D Immigration
Correct Answer: Economy
Explanation: The Prime Minister appoints about 20 senior MPs to become ministers in charge of departments. These include:
-Chancellor of the Exchequer - responsible for the economy ;
-Home Secretary - responsible for crime, policing and immigration ;
-Foreign Secretary - responsible for managing relationships with foreign countries ;
-other ministers (called 'Secretaries of State') responsible for subjects such as education, health and defence.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The cabinet
4. How often are members of Parliament (MPs) elected?
A At least every five years
B At least every three years
C Every six months
D Every year
Correct Answer: At least every five years
Explanation: MPs are elected at a General Election, which is held at least every five years. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - Elections
5. How old you need to be in order to stand for public office?
A 16
B 18
C 20
D 21
Correct Answer: 18
Explanation: Most citizens of the UK, the Irish Republic or the Commonwealth aged 18 or over can stand for public office. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Standing for office
6. Which TWO issues can the devolved administrations pass laws on?
A Education
B Foreign affairs
C Health
D Immigration
Correct Answer: Health, Education
Explanation: Policy and laws governing defence, foreign affairs, immigration, taxation and social security all remain under central UK government control. However, many other public services, such as education, are controlled by the devolved administrations.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Please refer to The government - Devolved administrations, The Welsh government, The Scottish Parliament and The Northern Ireland Assembly
7. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
A husband who forces his wife to have sex can be charged with rape.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Any man who forces a woman to have sex, including a woman's husband, can be charged with rape. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Domestic violence
8. Which TWO of the following do you have to pay tax on?
A Income from property, savings and dividends
B Profits from self-employment
C Shopping vouchers given to you by family or friends
D Small amounts of money given to you as a gift
Correct Answer: Profits from self-employment, Income from property, savings and dividends
Explanation: People in the UK have to pay tax on their income, which includes:
-wages from paid employment
-profits from self-employment ;
-taxable benefits ;
-pensions ;
-income from property, savings and dividends.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - Income Tax)
9. Which of these statements is correct?
A In the UK, employers can discriminate against different groups of people.
B UK laws ensure people are not treated unfairly in any area of work or life.
Correct Answer: UK laws ensure people are not treated unfairly in any area of work or life.
Explanation: UK laws ensure that people are not treated unfairly in any area of life or work because of their age, disability, sex, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sexuality or marital status. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Equal opportunities
10. What is the role of a jury at a court trial?
A To decide the sentence that the accused should be given
B To decide whether evidence should be allowed to be heard
C To decide whether the accused is 'guilty' or 'not guilty'
D To decide who the judge should be
Correct Answer: To decide whether the accused is 'guilty' or 'not guilty'
Explanation: The jury has to listen to the evidence presented at the trial and then decide a verdict of 'guilty' or 'not guilty' based on what they have heard.
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts
11. Which TWO of the following are examples of criminal law?
A Discrimination in the workplace
B Disputes about faulty goods
C Racial crime
D Selling tobacco to anyone under the age of 18
Correct Answer: Selling tobacco to anyone under the age of 18, Racial crime
Explanation: Examples of criminal laws are:
-Racial crime: it is a criminal offence to cause harassment, alarm or distress to someone because of their religion or ethnic origin. ;
-Selling tobacco: it is illegal to sell tobacco products (for example, cigarettes, cigars, roll-up tobacco) to anyone under the age of 18.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The law in the UK
12. Where is the National Assembly for Wales based?
A Cardiff
B Glasgow
C London
D Newport
Correct Answer: Cardiff
Explanation: The Welsh government and National Assembly for Wales are based in Cardiff, the capital city of Wales. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations - The Welsh government
13. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
 The main political parties actively look for members.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The main political parties actively look for members of the public to join their debates, contribute to their costs, and help at elections for Parliament or for local government. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The party system
14. How often are elections for the European Parliament held?
A Annually
B Every 10 years
C Every five years
D Every two years
Correct Answer: Every five years
Explanation: Elections for the European Parliament are also held every five years. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - Elections - European parliamentary elections
15. What is the minimum age you can drive a car or motor cycle in the UK?
A 17
B 18
C 21
D 25
Correct Answer: 17
Explanation: In the UK, you must be at least 17 years old to drive a car or motor cycle and you must have a driving licence to drive on public roads. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Driving
16. Which TWO countries are members of the Commonwealth?
A Australia
B Canada
C Ethiopia
D US
Correct Answer: Canada, Australia
Explanation: Australia and Canada are members of the Commonwealth. The Queen is the ceremonial head of the Commonwealth, which currently has 54 member states (see table).
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and International Institutions - The Commonwealth
17. Which TWO services are funded by National Insurance Contributions?
A Local taxi services
B National Health Service (NHS)
C State retirement pension
D Supermarket home deliveries
Correct Answer: State retirement pension, National Health Service (NHS)
Explanation: The money raised from National Insurance Contributions is used to pay for state benefits and services such as the state retirement pension and the National Health Service (NHS). 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - National insurance
18. Which of these statements is correct?
A County Courts deal with civil disputes.
B County Courts deal with criminal cases.
Correct Answer: County Courts deal with civil disputes.
Explanation: County Courts deal with a wide range of civil disputes. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Civil courts
19. Which TWO types of case are held in Country Courts?
A Breaches of contract
B Divorce
C Minor criminal offences
D Murder
Correct Answer: Breaches of contract, Divorce
Explanation: County Courts deal with a wide range of civil disputes. These include people trying to get back money that is owed to them, cases involving personal injury, family matters, breaches of contract, and divorce. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Civil courts
20. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
If a person is aged under 21, this case will be heard in a Youth Court.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, if an accused person is aged 10 to 17, the case is normally heard in a Youth Court in front of up to three specially trained magistrates or a District Judge. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts - Youth courts
21. Which TWO of the following are protected by law from discrimination?
A Choice of car
B Disability
C Eye colour
D Marital status
Correct Answer: Disability, Marital status
Explanation: UK laws ensure that people are not treated unfairly in any area of life or work because of their age, disability, sex, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sexuality or marital status. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Equal opportunities
22. Which of these statements is correct?
A The Speaker of the House of Commons has to give up being an MP when elected as Speaker.
B The Speaker of the House of Commons remains a Member of Parliament (MPs) after election as Speaker.
Correct Answer: The Speaker of the House of Commons remains a Member of Parliament (MPs) after election as Speaker.
Explanation: Debates in the House of Commons are chaired by the Speaker. This person is the chief officer of the House of Commons. The Speaker is neutral and does not represent a political party, even though he or she is an MP, represents a constituency and deals with constituents' problems like any other MP. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - The speaker
23. Which of the following will help you get along with your neighbours?
A Having an untidy garden
B Making lots of noise, especially late at night
C Only introducing yourself to them after a year
D Only putting rubbish and recycling out on collection days
Correct Answer: Only putting rubbish and recycling out on collection days
Explanation: You can help prevent any problems and conflicts with your neighbours by respecting their privacy and limiting how much noise you make. Also try to keep your garden tidy, and only put your refuse bags and bins on the street or in communal areas if they are due to be collected.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Your role in the community -  Being a good neighbour
24. Which of these statements is correct?
A Magistrates must be specially trained legal experts who have been solicitors for three years.
B Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Correct Answer: Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Explanation: Magistrates and Justices of the Peace (JPs) are members of the local community. In England, Wales and Scotland they usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications. 
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Criminal Courts - Magistrates' and Justice of the Peace Courts