You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. In Northern Ireland, children who have committed an offence are dealt with by which of the following?
A A Youth Court
B A system called the Children's Hearings System
C A system of youth conferencing
D Crown Court
Correct Answer: A system of youth conferencing
Explanation: Northern Ireland has a system of youth conferencing to consider how a child should be dealt with when they have committed an offence. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts - Youth Courts
2. What did hereditary peers lose in 1999?
A The automatic right to sit in the House of Lords
B The right to elect other peers to the House of Lords
C The right to own land
D The right to speak in Parliament
Correct Answer: The automatic right to sit in the House of Lords
Explanation: Since 1999, hereditary peers have lost the automatic right to attend the House of Lords. They now elect a few of their number to represent them in the House of Lords. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - The House of Lords
3. Which of these statements is correct?
A In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Crown Court
B In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Sheriff Court
Correct Answer: In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Sheriff Court
Explanation: In Scotland, serious cases are heard in a Sheriff Court with either a sheriff or a sheriff with a jury. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts
4. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Breaking a Forced Marriage Protection Order can result in a prison sentence.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: A potential victim, or someone acting for them, can apply for an order. Anyone found to have breached an order can be jailed for up to two years for contempt of court. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Forced marriage
5. If you can't make it to a polling station to vote, you can register for which of the following?
A A postal ballot
B A virtual ballot
C An absentee ballot
D An absentee vote
Correct Answer: A postal ballot
Explanation: If it is difficult for you to get to a polling station or polling place, you can register for a postal ballot. Your ballot paper will be sent to your home before the election.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Where to vote
6. Who is the heir to the throne?
A All the above
B Prince Charles
C Prince Philip
D The Prime Minister
Correct Answer: Prince Charles
Explanation: She is married to Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. Her eldest son, Prince Charles (the Prince of Wales), is the heir to the throne. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - The monarchy
7. Income tax is not paid on which of the following forms of income?
A All of the above
B Benefits
C Money you win on the lottery
D Pension
Correct Answer: Money you win on the lottery
Explanation: People in the UK have to pay tax on their income, which includes:
-wages from paid employment ;
-profits from self-employment ;
-taxable benefits ;
-pensions ;
-income from property, savings and dividends.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - Income tax
8. How many members does a jury have in England?
A 10
B 12
C 15
D 20
Correct Answer: 12
Explanation: In England, Wales and Northern Ireland a jury has 12 members, and in Scotland a jury has 15 members.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Court
9. What are MEPs?
A Members of the English Parliament
B Members of the European Parliament
C Modern English parliamentarians
D Modern European parliamentarians
Correct Answer: Members of the European Parliament
Explanation: Elections for the European Parliament are also held every five years. Elected members are called members of the European Parliament (MEPs).
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - Elections - European parliamentary elections
10. Which TWO of the following deal with civil disputes?
A County Court
B Crown Court
C Sheriff Court
D Youth Court
Correct Answer: County Court, Sheriff Court
Explanation: County Courts deal with a wide range of civil disputes. These include people trying to get back money that is owed to them, cases involving personal injury, family matters, breaches of contract, and divorce. In Scotland, most of these matters are dealt with in the Sheriff Court. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Civil courts
11. Which TWO of these groups cannot stand for election?
A Civil servants
B Health Service workers
C Members of the armed forces
D Members of the police force
Correct Answer: Members of the armed forces, Civil servants
Explanation: Most citizens of the UK, the Irish republic or the Commonwealth aged 18 or over can stand for public office. There are some exceptions, including:
• Members of the armed forces
• Civil servants
• People found guilty of certain criminal offences.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Standing for office
12. In the UK, it is acceptable to discriminate against people for which of the following?
A Age
B None of the above
C Pregnancy or maternity
D Religion or beliefs
Correct Answer: None of the above
Explanation: UK laws ensure that people are not treated unfairly in any area of life or work because of their age, disability, sex, pregnancy and maternity, race, religion or belief, sexuality or marital status. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Fundamental principles - Equal opportunities
13. Which of these statements is correct?
A The cabinet's decisions must always be debated or approved by Parliament.
B The cabinet's decisions often have to be debated or approved by Parliament.
Correct Answer: The cabinet's decisions often have to be debated or approved by Parliament.
Explanation: These ministers form the cabinet, a committee which usually meets weekly and makes important decisions about government policy. Many of these decisions have to be debated or approved by Parliament. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government , the law and your role - The government - The cabinet
14. Which of these statements is correct?
A You should always introduce yourself to your neighbours when you move into a new house or flat.
B You should never introduce yourself to your new neighbours, but should let them introduce themselves.
Correct Answer: You should always introduce yourself to your neighbours when you move into a new house or flat.
Explanation: When you move into a new house or apartment, introduce yourself to the people who live near you. Getting to know your neighbours can help you to become part of the community and make friends. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Your role in the community - Being a good neighbour
15. Which of the following is a core value of the civil service?
A Bribery
B Integrity
C Laziness
D Party loyalty
Correct Answer: Integrity
Explanation: Civil servants are expected to carry out their role with dedication and a commitment to the civil service and its core values. These are: integrity, honesty, objectivity and impartiality (including being politically neutral). 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The civil service
16. A vehicle more than three years old must pass an MOT test every year. What does MOT stand for?
A Maintenance of Transportation
B Migrant Order for Transport
C Ministry of Transport
D Motor-vehicle Optimisation Test
Correct Answer: Ministry of Transport
Explanation: You must also have valid motor insurance. It is a serious criminal offence to drive without insurance. If your vehicle is over three years old, you must take it for a Ministry of Transport (MOT) test every year. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Driving
17. Which TWO actions can political parties undertake to gain support for their candidate?
A Handling out leaflets
B Knocking on doors and talking
C Paying people to vote a certain way
D Threatening people to make them vote a certain way
Correct Answer: Knocking on doors and talking, Handling out leaflets
Explanation: Members work hard to persuade people to vote for their candidates - for instance, by handing out leaflets in the street or by knocking on people's doors and asking for their support. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Supporting political parties
18. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Welsh Assembly has no power to make laws, but considerable control over public services.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The Assembly has the power to make laws for Wales in 20 areas, including:
-education and training ;
-health and social services ;
-economic development ;
-housing.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations - The Welsh government
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A More than 190 countries belong to NATO
B More than 190 countries belong to the United Nations.
Correct Answer: More than 190 countries belong to the United Nations.
Explanation: The UK is part of the United Nations (UN), an international organisation with more than 190 countries as members. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The United Nations
20. In a Crown Court, who decided the verdict of 'guilty' or 'not guilty'?
A The Judge
B The Jury
C The barrister
D The defendant
Correct Answer: The Jury
Explanation: The jury has to listen to the evidence presented at the trial and then decide a verdict of 'guilty' or 'not guilty' based on what they have heard. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown courts and Sheriffs courts
21. How is the electoral register updated?
A Every household must request a registration form
B Every household receives a phone call to enquire about eligible voters
C Every household receives a registration form, which must be completed and returned
D How is the electoral register updated?
Correct Answer: Every household receives a registration form, which must be completed and returned
Explanation: An electoral registration form is sent to every household and this has to be completed and returned with the names of everyone who is resident in the household and eligible to vote. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Who can vote? - The electoral register
22. A poll card includes which TWO pieces of information?
A How much tax you should pay
B The date of the election
C Where the polling station or polling place is located
D Who you should vote for
Correct Answer: The date of the election, Where the polling station or polling place is located
Explanation: People vote in elections at places called polling stations, or polling places in Scotland. Before the election you will be sent a poll card. This tells you where your polling station or polling place is and when the election will take place. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and you role - The government - Where to vote
23. How many people make up a Scottish jury?
A 10
B 12
C 15
D 20
Correct Answer: 15
Explanation: A jury is made up of members of the public chosen at random from the local electoral register (see page 134). In England, Wales and Northern Ireland a jury has 12 members, and in Scotland a jury has 15 members. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts
24. Which one of the following is not a benefit of volunteering?
A Being able to add new experience to your CV
B Being paid
C Having a chance to practise English
D Meeting new people
Correct Answer: Being paid
Explanation: Volunteering is working for good causes without payment. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Other ways to volunteer