You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Which of the following is a fundamental principle of British life?
A Extremism
B Individual liberty
C Inequality
D Intolerance
Correct Answer: Individual liberty
Explanation: The fundamental principles of British life include:
- Democracy
- The rule of law
- Individual liberty
- Tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs
- Participation in community life.
Reference: Chapter 1: The values and principles of the UK
2. Dunkirk is associated with which TWO events?
A Landings on D-Day
B Small boats coming to the rescue
C The fall of Singapore
D The rescue of 300,000 men
Correct Answer: The rescue of 300,000 men, Small boats coming to the rescue
Explanation: Many civilian volunteers in small pleasure and fishing boats from Britain helped the Navy to rescue more than 300,000 men from the beaches around Dunkirk. Although many lives and a lot of equipment were lost, the evacuation was a success and meant that Britain was better able to continue the fight against the Germans.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
King Henry Vlll created the Church of England when the pope refused to grant him a divorce.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: To divorce his first wife, Henry needed the approval of the Pope. When the Pope refused, Henry established the Church of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
4. Who was king of England at the time of the Norman invasion in 1066?
A Harold
B Henry VIII
C Herbert
D Hubert
Correct Answer: Harold
Explanation: In 1066, an invasion led by William, the Duke of Normandy (in what is now northern France), defeated Harold, the Saxon king of England, at the Battle of Hastings. Harold was killed in the battle.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Norman Conquest
5. Is this statement TRUE or FALSE? During Queen Victoria's reign, the French Empire became the largest Empire the world has ever seen.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: During the Victorian period, the British Empire grew to cover all of India, Australia and large parts of Africa. It became the largest empire the world has ever seen, with an estimated population of more than 400 million people.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The British Empire
6. Which stories are associated with Geoffrey Chaucer?
A The Ambridge Tales
B The Canterbury Tales
C The London Tales
D The Westbury Tales
Correct Answer: The Canterbury Tales
Explanation: In the years leading up to 1400, Geoffrey Chaucer wrote a series of poems in English about a group of people going to Canterbury on a pilgrimage. The people decided to tell each other stories on the journey, and the poems describe the travellers and some of the stories they told. This collection of poems is called The Canterbury Tales.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
7. Which of these statements is correct?
A The declaration of rights read at the coronation of William and Mary meant the monarch could no longer raise taxes or administer justice.
B The declaration of rights read at the coronation of William and Mary meant the monarch had absolute power to rule without the interference of Parliament.
Correct Answer: The declaration of rights read at the coronation of William and Mary meant the monarch could no longer raise taxes or administer justice.
Explanation: At the coronation of William and Mary, a Declaration of Rights was read. This confirmed that the king would no longer be able to raise taxes or administer justice without agreement from Parliament. The balance of power between monarch and Parliament had now permanently changed.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - Constitutional monarchy — the Bill of Rights
8. Which of the following is a British innovation?
A The Internet
B The Turing machine
C The diesel engine
D The telephone
Correct Answer: The Turing machine
Explanation: A Turing machine is a theoretical mathematical device invented by Alan Turing (1912-54), a British mathematician, in the 1930s. The theory was influential in the development of computer science and the modern-day computer.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
9. Which is the capital city of the UK?
A Birmingham
B London
C Westminster
D Windsor
Correct Answer: London
Explanation: The capital city of the UK is London.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK)
10. What is the name of the UK currency?
A Dollar
B Euro
C Pound Sterling
D Yen
Correct Answer: Pound Sterling
Explanation: The currency in the UK is the pound sterling (symbol GBP ).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - UK currency
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A All shops in the UK close on Sunday.
B Most shops in the UK open seven days a week.
Correct Answer: Most shops in the UK open seven days a week.
Explanation: Most shops in the UK are open seven days a week, although trading hours on Sundays and public holidays are generally reduced.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Shopping
12. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
John Constable (1776 -1837) founded the modern police force in England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: John Constable (1776-1837) was a landscape painter most famous for his works of Dedham Vale on the Suffolk-Essex border in the east of England.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art - Notable British artists
13. How often does Prime Ministers questions occur when Parliament is sitting?
A Every day
B Once a month
C Once a week
D Twice a week
Correct Answer: Once a week
Explanation: One important opportunity to do this is at Prime Minister's Questions, which takes place every week while Parliament is sitting. 
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The opposition
14. Which TWO of the following are famous British artists?
A Andy Murray
B David Hockney
C Henry Moore
D Sir Edward Elgar
Correct Answer: Henry Moore, David Hockney
Explanation: David Hockney (1937-) was an important contributor to the 'pop art' movement of the 1960s and continues to be influential today. ; Henry Moore (1898-1986) was an English sculptor and artist. He is best known for his large bronze abstract sculptures.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Art - Notable British artists
15. Gertrude Jekyll is famous for her designs in which field?
A Fashion
B Gardening
C Pottery
D Silverware
Correct Answer: Gardening
Explanation: Gertrude Jekyll often worked with Edwin Lutyens to design colourful gardens around the houses he designed.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Architecture
16. Which of these statements is correct?
A You have to be aged 16 or over to buy a National Lottery ticket.
B You have to be aged 18 or over to buy a National Lottery ticket.
Correct Answer: You have to be aged 16 or over to buy a National Lottery ticket.
Explanation: There is a National Lottery for which draws are made every week. You can enter by buying a ticket or a scratch card. People under 16 are not allowed to participate in the National Lottery.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Betting and gambling
17. The UK joined which international organisation in 1973?
A NATO
B The Commonwealth
C The EU
D The European Commission
Correct Answer: The EU
Explanation: The UK joined the EU (or the EEC as it was known at the time) on 1 January 1973.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The United Nations
18. Which TWO of the following do pressure and lobby groups do?
A Assist MP's in their constituency work
B Influence government policy
C Organise violent protests
D Represent the views of British businesses
Correct Answer: Represent the views of British businesses, Influence government policy
Explanation: Pressure and lobby groups are organisations which try to influence government policy. They play an important role in politics. Some are representative organisations such as the CBI (Confederation of British Industry), which represents the views of British business.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The party system
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A Magistrates must be specially trained legal experts who have been solicitors for three years.
B Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Correct Answer: Magistrates usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications
Explanation: Magistrates and Justices of the Peace (JPs) are members of the local community. In England, Wales and Scotland they usually work unpaid and do not need legal qualifications. 
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Criminal Courts - Magistrates' and Justice of the Peace Courts
20. What are TWO benefits of volunteering?
A Earning additional money
B Making your community a better place
C Meeting new people
D You are given a courtesy car as transport
Correct Answer: Making your community a better place, Meeting new people
Explanation: There are many benefits to volunteering, such as meeting new people and helping make your community a better place. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Other ways to volunteer
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
You can support your local community by becoming a school governor or school board member.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: School governors, or members of the school board in Scotland, are people from the local community who wish to make a positive contribution to children's education. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Helping in schools - School governors and school boards
22. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The devolved Scottish government rules Scotland from Edinburgh.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Scottish Parliament was formed in 1999. It sits in Edinburgh, the capital city of Scotland. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations - The Scottish Parliament
23. Which of these statements is correct?
A A Magistrates' Court deals with minor criminal offences.
B A Magistrates' Court deals with only the most serious criminal cases.
Correct Answer: A Magistrates' Court deals with minor criminal offences.
Explanation: In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, most minor criminal cases are dealt with in a Magistrates' Court.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Criminal courts - Magistrates' and Justice of the Peace Courts
24. Who is the heir to the throne?
A All the above
B Prince Charles
C Prince Philip
D The Prime Minister
Correct Answer: Prince Charles
Explanation: She is married to Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. Her eldest son, Prince Charles (the Prince of Wales), is the heir to the throne. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - The monarchy