You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Which TWO are British overseas territories?
A Falkland Islands
B Hawaii
C St Helena
Correct Answer: Falkland Islands, St Helena
Explanation: There are also several British overseas territories in other parts of the world, such as St Helena and the Falkland Islands. They are also linked to the UK but are not a part of it.
Reference: Chapter 2: What is the UK
2. Which TWO of the following were famous Victorians?
A Dylan Thomas
B Florence Nightingale
C Isambard Kingdom Brunel
D Margaret Thatcher
Correct Answer: Florence Nightingale, Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Explanation: Brunel was originally from Portsmouth, England. He was an engineer who built tunnels, bridges, railway lines and ships; In 1854, she went to Turkey and worked in military hospitals, treating soldiers who were fighting in the Crimean War. She and her fellow nurses improved the conditions in the hospital and reduced the mortality rate.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - Trade and Industry; Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Crimean War
3. Who were the 'suffragettes'?
A Women who campaigned for women's votes
B Women who chose to be single
C Women who left the UK to live in India
D Women who stayed at home to raise a family
Correct Answer: Women who campaigned for women's votes
Explanation: In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an increasing number of women campaigned and demonstrated for greater rights and, in particular, the right to vote. They formed the women's suffrage movement and became known as 'suffragettes'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The right to vote
4. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Swinging Sixties is associated with the 1860s.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The decade of the 1960's was a period of significant social change. It was known as 'the Swinging Sixties'.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
5. Which group of refugees settled in England before 1720?
A Brelons
B Germans
C Huguenots
D Welsh
Correct Answer: Huguenots
Explanation: The first Jews to come to Britain since the Middle Ages settled in London in 1656. Between 1680 and 1720 many refugees called Huguenots came from France.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - A growing population
6. During the 1960s, Parliament passed new laws that made it illegal for employers to discriminate against women because of their gender and gave them which right?
A Childcare at work
B Equal pay
C Free lunches
D Two year's maternity leave
Correct Answer: Equal pay
Explanation: It was quite common at the time for employers to ask women to leave their jobs when they got married, but Parliament passed new laws giving women the right to equal pay and made it illegal for employers to discriminate against women because of their gender.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
7. On his escape from the Battle of Worcester, Charles II famously hid inside what?
A A cellar
B A forest
C An oak tree
D None of the above
Correct Answer: An oak tree
Explanation: Charles II escaped from Worcester, famously hiding in an oak tree on one occasion, and eventually fled to Europe. Parliament now controlled Scotland as well as England and Wales.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
8. Which of these statements is correct?
A Robert Burns wrote in Scots language.
B Robert Burns wrote in Scots, English and a combination of both.
Correct Answer: Robert Burns wrote in Scots, English and a combination of both.
Explanation: Known in Scotland as 'The Bard', Robert Burns was a Scottish poet. He wrote in the Scots language, English with some Scottish words, and standard English. He also revised a lot of traditional folk songs by changing or adding lyrics. Burns' best-known work is probably the song Auld Lang Syne, which is sung by people in the UK and other countries when they are celebrating the New Year (or Hogmanay as it is called in Scotland).
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The rebellion of the clans
9. Where did the Boer war take place?
A England
B France
C South Africa
D Turkey
Correct Answer: South Africa
Explanation: The Boer War of 1899 to 1902 made the discussions about the future of the Empire more urgent. The British went to war in South Africa with settlers from the Netherlands called the Boers.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The future of the Empire
10. Rudyard Kipling was awarded which major prize in 1907?
A The Man Booker Prize
B The Nobel Prize in Literature
C The Pulitzer Prize
D The Somerset Maugham Award
Correct Answer: The Nobel Prize in Literature
Explanation: Kipling was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1907.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The future of the Empire
11. Which TWO of the following statements are correct?
A The Roman army faced no resistance during the invasions.
B The Romans built roads and public buildings, and created a structure of law.
C The Romans introduced new plants and animals to Britain.
D The Romans unified the whole of the British Isles.
Correct Answer: The Romans introduced new plants and animals to Britain., The Romans built roads and public buildings, and created a structure of law.
Explanation: The Romans remained in Britain for 400 years. They built roads and public buildings, created a structure of law, and introduced new plants and animals.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Romans
12. In England, parliaments were called when the king needed to consult the nobles and for what other reason?
A To call elections
B To create new lords
C To lower taxes
D To raise money
Correct Answer: To raise money
Explanation: In England, parliaments were called for the king to consult his nobles, particularly when the king needed to raise money.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - legal and political changes
13. Charles I believed, and tried to rule in line with, what principles?
A Communism
B Democracy
C Religious virtue
D The Diving Rights of Kings
Correct Answer: The Diving Rights of Kings
Explanation: James I and his son Charles I were less skilled politically. Both believed in the 'Divine Right of Kings': the idea that the king was directly appointed by God to rule.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious - The Tudors and Stuarts - The rise of the Parliament
14. Jane Seymour gave birth to the son Henry VIII wanted. What was his name?
A Edmund
B Edward
C Henry
D Richard
Correct Answer: Edward
Explanation: Jane Seymour - Henry married Jane after Anne's execution. She gave Henry the son he wanted, Edward, but she died shortly after the birth.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
15. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The American colonies rebelled against the British Parliament in the 18th century because they did not want to pay taxes without representation in Parliament.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: In 1776, 13 American colonies declared their independence, stating that people had a right to establish their own governments. The colonists eventually defeated the British army and Britain recognised the colonies' independence in 1783.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The American War of Independence
16. Textile and engineering firms recruited workers from which TWO countries after the Second World War?
A Canada
B India
C Pakistan
D South Africa
Correct Answer: India, Pakistan
Explanation: Textile and engineering firms from the north of England and the Midlands sent agents to India and Pakistan to find workers. For about 25 years, people from the West Indies, India, Pakistan and (later) Bangladesh travelled to work and settle in Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Migration in post-war Britain
17. The UK has what kind of monarchy?
A Absolute
B Constitutional
C Democratic
D Provisional
Correct Answer: Constitutional
Explanation: The laws passed after the Glorious Revolution are the beginning of what is called 'constitutional monarchy'.
Reference: The laws passed after the Glorious Revolution are the beginning of what is called 'constitutional monarchy'.
18. Where in London is the White Tower?
A Buckingham Palace
B Palace of Westminster
C St Paul's Cathedral
D Tower of London
Correct Answer: Tower of London
Explanation: The White Tower in the Tower of London is an example of a Norman castle keep, built on the orders of William the Conqueror
Reference: Arts and culture - Architecture
19. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Mo Farah and Jessica Ennis are well-known athletes who won gold medals at the 2012 London Olympics.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Jessica Ennis (1980-) is an athlete. She won the 2012 Olympic gold medal in the heptathlon, which includes seven different track and field events. She also holds a number of British athletics records. Mo Farah (1983-) is a British distance runner, born in Somalia. He won gold medals in the 2012 Olympics for the 5,000 and 10,000 metres and is the first Briton to win the Olympic gold medal in the 10,000 metres.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sports - Notable British sportsmen and women
20. Which UK city hosted the 2012 Paralympics Games?
A Belfast
B Cardiff
C Edinburgh
D London
Correct Answer: London
Explanation: The Paralympic Games for 2012 were also hosted in London.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport
21. Which of the following takes place on 14 February every year?
A All Saints Day
B St Christopher's Day
C St George's Day
D St Valentine's Day
Correct Answer: St Valentine's Day
Explanation: Valentine's Day, 14 February, is when lovers exchange cards and gifts. Sometimes people send anonymous cards to someone they secretly admire.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and traditions
22. Who wrote the poem The Tyger?
A William Blake
B William Shakespeare
C William Wallace
D William Wordsworth
Correct Answer: William Blake
Explanation: Tyger! Tyger! Burning bright, In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye, Could frame thy fearful symmetry?' (William Blake, 1757-1827 - The Tyger)
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - literature - British poets
23. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Members of the public are allowed to attend Youth Court hearings.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Members of the public are not allowed In Youth Courts, and the name or photographs of the accused young person cannot be published in newspapers or used by the media.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts - Youth Courts
24. Anyone who wishes to buy tobacco or tobacco products must be over what age?
A 14
B 16
C 18
D 21
Correct Answer: 18
Explanation: Selling tobacco: it is illegal to sell tobacco products (for example, cigarettes, cigars, roll-up tobacco) to anyone under the age of 18.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The law in the UK