You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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1. Which of these statements is correct?
A The United Kingdom consists of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
B The United Kingdom consists of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
Correct Answer: The United Kingdom consists of England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
Explanation: The UK is made up of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The rest of Ireland is an independent county.
Reference: Chapter 2: What is the UK
2. What important event happened in England in 1066?
A The Battle of Bannockburn
B The Norman invasion
C The Romans left England
D The building of the Offa Dyke
Correct Answer: The Norman invasion
Explanation: In 1066, an invasion led by William, the Duke of Normandy (in what is now northern France), defeated Harold, the Saxon king of England, at the Battle of Hastings. Harold was killed in the battle. William became king of England and is known as William the Conqueror.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Norman conquest
3. Who was given the title of Lord Protector in the 17th century?
A Isaac Newton
B King Charles II
C Oliver Cromwell
D Samuel Pepys
Correct Answer: Oliver Cromwell
Explanation: After his campaign in Ireland and victory over Charles II at Worcester, Cromwell was recognised as the leader of the new republic. He was given the title of Lord Protector and ruled until his death in 1658.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
4. Which of these statements is correct?
A By 1400 the preferred language of English court was English
B By 1400 the preferred language of English court was French
Correct Answer: By 1400 the preferred language of English court was English
Explanation: By 1400, in England, official documents were being written in English, and English had become the preferred language of the royal court and Parliament.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
5. Which country of the UK is not represented on the Union Flag?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Wales
Explanation: The Union Flag consists of three crosses:
-The cross of St George, patron saint of England, is a red cross on a white ground. ;
-The cross of St Andrew, patron saint of Scotland, is a diagonal white cross on a blue ground. ;
-The cross of St Patrick, patron saint of Ireland, is a diagonal red cross on a white ground.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Union Flag
6. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
By around AD 600, Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were established in Britain.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Roman army left Britain in AD 410 to defend other parts of the Roman Empire and never returned. Britain was again invaded by tribes from northern Europe: the Jute's, the Angles and the Saxons. The languages they spoke are the basis of modern-day English. Battles were fought against these invaders but, by about AD 600, Anglo-Saxon kingdoms were established in Britain. These kingdoms were mainly in what is now England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Anglo-Saxons
7. Which of these statements is correct?
A After the Black Death, there were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages.
B The Black Death destroyed cereal crops, leading to a famine that killed many peasants.
Correct Answer: After the Black Death, there were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages.
Explanation: Following the Black Death, the smaller population meant there was less need to grow cereal crops. There were labour shortages and peasants began to demand higher wages. New social classes appeared, including owners of large areas of land (later called the gentry), and people left the countryside to live in the towns. In the towns, growing wealth led to the development of a strong middle class.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Black Death
8. Which TWO places did the Vikings come from?
A Belgium
B Denmark
C France
D Norway
Correct Answer: Denmark, Norway
Explanation: The Vikings came from Denmark and Norway.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Vikings
9. What sorts of stories were depicted in the stained glass windows of many cathedrals built in The Middle Ages?
A Stories about battles and victories
B Stories about communities and farming
C Stories about kings and coronations
D Stories about the Bible and saints
Correct Answer: Stories about the Bible and saints
Explanation: Several of the cathedrals had windows of stained glass, telling stories about the Bible and Christian saints. The glass in York Minister is a famous example.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - A distinct identity
10. What is the capital city of Scotland?
A Aberdeen
B Dundee
C Edinburgh
D Glasgow
Correct Answer: Edinburgh
Explanation: Scotland, The capital city of Scotland is Edinburgh
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A EastEnders and Coronation Street are historical landmarks.
B EastEnders and Coronation Street are popular television programmes.
Correct Answer: EastEnders and Coronation Street are popular television programmes.
Explanation: Popular programmes include regular soap operas such as Coronation Street and EastEnders.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern thriving society - Leisure - Television and radio
12. Which TWO are Protestant Christian groups in the UK?
A Baptists
B Buddhist
C Methodists
D Roman Catholics
Correct Answer: Methodists, Baptists
Explanation: Other Protestant Christian groups in the UK are Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians and Quakers.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Religion - Christian churches
13. What is a bank holiday?
A A holiday just for people working in banks.
B A public holiday when banks and other businesses close for the day.
C A week off for everyone in the UK.
D An extra holiday entitlement for working longer hours than usual.
Correct Answer: A public holiday when banks and other businesses close for the day.
Explanation: As well as those mentioned previously, there are other public holidays each year called bank holidays, when banks and many other businesses are closed for the day.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Bank holidays
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Cardiff, Swansea and Newport are cities in England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Cardiff, Swansea and Newport are cities in England.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
15. The British equivalent of the Oscars is hosted by BAFTA. For what do these initials stand?
A British Academy of Film and Television Arts
B British Academy of Film and Theatre Awards
C British Association of Film and Technical Appliances
D British Awards for Film and Televisions Actors
Correct Answer: British Academy of Film and Television Arts
Explanation: The annual British Academy Film Awards, hosted by the British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), are the British equivalent of the Oscars.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry
16. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Jane Austen and Charles Dickens were both famous sculptors.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English novelist. Her books include Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. Her novels are concerned with marriage and family relationships. Many have been made into television programmes or films. ; Charles Dickens (1812-70) wrote a number of very famous novels, including Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. You will hear references in everyday talk to some of the characters in his books, such as Scrooge (a mean person) or Mr Micawber (always hopeful).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
17. Areas of protected countryside that everyone can visit and where people live, work and look after the landscape are called which of the following?
A Country estates
B Greenfield sites
C Moorland
D National parks
Correct Answer: National parks
Explanation: The UK has a large network of public footpaths in the countryside. There are also many opportunities for mountain biking, mountaineering and hill walking. There are 15 national parks in England, Wales and Scotland. They are areas of protected countryside that everyone can visit, and where people live, work and look after the landscape.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest
18. Which of these is not a Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera?
A A Midsummer Night's Dream
B HMS Pinafore
C The Mikado
D The Pirates o Penzance
Correct Answer: A Midsummer Night's Dream
Explanation: In the 19th century, Gilbert and Sullivan wrote comic operas, often making fun of popular culture and politics. These operas include HMS Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado. Gilbert and Sullivan's work is still often staged by professional and amateur groups.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Theatre
19. Which of these statements is correct?
A People in the UK are living longer than ever before.
B The average lifespan for UK residents is steadily decreasing
Correct Answer: People in the UK are living longer than ever before.
Explanation: People in the UK are living longer than ever before. This is due to improved living standards and better health care. There are now a record number of people aged 85 and over. This has an impact on the cost of pensions and health care.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Population - An ageing population
20. Who has to pay National Insurance Contributions?
A All those aged 50 and below
B Everybody in the UK who is in paid work
C People who work full-time
D Single people with no dependents
Correct Answer: Everybody in the UK who is in paid work
Explanation: Almost everybody in the UK who is in paid work, including self-employed people, must pay National Insurance Contributions. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Taxation - National Insurance
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The candidate who wins the most votes is elected MP for the constituency.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: MPs are elected through a system called 'first past the post'. In each constituency, the candidate who gets the most votes is elected. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - System of government - Elections
22. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
If you are a commonwealth citizen living in the UK you can vote in all public elections.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Adult citizens of the UK, and citizens of the Commonwealth and the Irish Republic who are resident in the UK, can vote in all public elections. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Who can vote?
23. What age group does the National Citizen Service programme cover?
A 16- and 17-year-old
B 18-to 30-year-olds
C All children up to the age of 17
D Pensioners
Correct Answer: 16- and 17-year-old
Explanation: These include the National Citizen Service programme, which gives 16- and 17-year-olds the opportunity to enjoy outdoor activities, develop their skills and take part in a community project. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Other ways to volunteer
24. Is it possible for the leader of the opposition to become Prime Minister?
A Yes, if his or her party wins a General Election
B Yes, if the Prime Minister resigns
Correct Answer: Yes, if his or her party wins a General Election
Explanation: The second-largest party in the House of Commons is called the opposition. The leader of the opposition usually becomes Prime Minister if his or her party wins the next General Election. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The opposition