You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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1. Why was the Habeas Corpus Act of 1679 so important?
A It allowed people to bury the dead where they wished.
B It ended capital punishment in England.
C It ensured no person could be held unlawfully.
D It ensured that those who died could only be buried by a relative.
Correct Answer: It ensured no person could be held unlawfully.
Explanation: Habeas corpus is Latin for 'you must present the person in court'. The Act guaranteed that no one could be held prisoner unlawfully.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Restoration
2. Which TWO points about slavery are correct?
A Quakers set up the first anti-slavery groups.
B Slavery survived in the British Empire until the early 20th century.
C The Royal Navy refused to stop ships carrying slaves.
D William Wilberforce was a leading abolitionist.
Correct Answer: Quakers set up the first anti-slavery groups., William Wilberforce was a leading abolitionist.
Explanation: The first formal anti-slavery groups were set up by the Quakers in the late 1700s, and they petitioned Parliament to ban the practice. William Wilberforce, an evangelical Christian and a member of Parliament, also played an important part in changing the law. Along with other abolitionists (people who supported the abolition of slavery), he succeeded in turning public opinion against the slave trade.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The slave trade
3. After the Act of Union, Scotland was no longer an independent country. In what ways was is it still separate from the rest of Great Britain?
A All of the above
B It kept its own Presbyterian church
C It kept its own educational system
D It kept its own legal system
Correct Answer: All of the above
Explanation: The Act of Union, known as the Treaty of Union in Scotland, was therefore agreed in 1707, creating the Kingdom of Great Britain. Although Scotland was no longer an Independent country, it kept its own legal and education systems and Presbyterian Church.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power- The Act or Treaty of Union in Scotland
4. After his campaign in Ireland and his defeat of Charles II, Oliver Cromwell was given what title?
A Chieftain
B King
C Lord Lieutenant
D Lord Protector
Correct Answer: Lord Protector
Explanation: After his campaign in Ireland and victory over Charles II at Worcester, Cromwell was recognised as the leader of the new republic. He was given the title of Lord Protector and ruled until his death in 1658. When Cromwell died, his son, Richard, became Lord Protector in his place but was not able to control the army or the government.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
5. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Under the system of feudalism, the kings gave land to lords, and the landowners had to send men to serve in the army in return.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The Normans used a system of land ownership known as feudalism. The king gave land to his lords in return for help in war. Landowners had to send certain numbers of men to serve in the army.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - The Black Death
6. Who was Kenneth MacAlpin?
A A Danish King
B A Viking
C An Anglo-Saxon king
D The Scottish king
Correct Answer: The Scottish king
Explanation: In the north, the threat of attack by Vikings had encouraged the people to unite under one king, Kenneth MacAlpin. The term Scotland began to be used to describe that country.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain - The Vikings
7. What happened to Catherine Parr
A She Died
B She had a daughter
C She had a son
D She was executed
Correct Answer: She Died
Explanation: Catherine Parr - Catherine was a widow who married Henry late in his life. She survived him and married again but died soon after.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
8. During the 19th century which sector of the Irish economy supported around two-thirds of its people?
A Farming
B Manufacturing
C Shipbuilding
D Tourism
Correct Answer: Farming
Explanation: Conditions in Ireland were not as good as in the rest of the UK. Two-thirds of the population still depended on farming to make their living, often on very small plots of land.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - Ireland in the 19th century
9. How old was Edward VI when he died?
A 15
B 18
C 35
D 56
Correct Answer: 15
Explanation: Henry VIII was succeeded by his son Edward VI, who was strongly Protestant. During his reign, the Book of Common Prayer was written to be used in the Church of England. A version of this book is still used in some churches today. Edward died at the age of 15 after ruling for just over six years, and his half-sister Mary became queen.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
10. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
People are able to buy National Lottery tickets in the UK if they are aged 14 or over.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: People under 16 are not allowed to participate in the National Lottery.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Betting and gambling
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A Both Jane Austen and Charles Dickens are famous novelists
B Both Jane Austen and Charles Dickens are famous painters
Correct Answer: Both Jane Austen and Charles Dickens are famous novelists
Explanation: Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English novelist. Her books include Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. Her novels are concerned with marriage and family relationships. Many have been made into television programmes or films. Charles Dickens (1812-70) wrote a number of very famous novels, including Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. You will hear references in everyday talk to some of the characters in his books, such as Scrooge (a mean person) or Mr Micawber (always hopeful).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
12. Which of these statements is correct?
A A famous sailing event is held at Crowes on the Isle of Wight.
B A famous sailing event is held in the city of Belfast.
Correct Answer: A famous sailing event is held at Crowes on the Isle of Wight.
Explanation: Many sailing events are held throughout the UK, the most famous of which is at Cowes on the Isle of Wight.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Water sports
13. Which of these statements is correct?
A The Mousetrap is a play that has been running in London's West End since 1952.
B The Mousetrap is an environmental policy aiming to prevent mice from destroying crops.
Correct Answer: The Mousetrap is a play that has been running in London's West End since 1952.
Explanation: The Mousetrap, a murder-mystery play by Dame Agatha Christie, has been running in the West End since 1952 and has had the longest initial run of any show in history.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and Culture - Theatre
14. Which TWO are famous horse-racing events?
A Royal Ascot
B The Cup Final
C The Grand National
D The Six Nations
Correct Answer: The Grand National, Royal Ascot
Explanation: Famous horse-racing events include: Royal Ascot, a five-day race meeting in Berkshire attended by members of the Royal Family; the Grand National at Aintree near Liverpool; and the Scottish Grand National at Ayr.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Horse racing
15. What is a traditional pub game in the UK?
A Poker
B Pool
C Rounders
D Scrabble
Correct Answer: Pool
Explanation: Pool and darts are traditional pub games.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Pubs and night clubs
16. Which of these books did Graham Greene not write?
A Brighton Rock
B Moby Dick
C The Heart of the Matter
D The Honorary Consul
Correct Answer: Moby Dick
Explanation: Graham Greene (1904-91) wrote novels often influenced by his religious beliefs, including The Heart of the Matter, The Honorary Consul, Brighton Rock and Our Man in Havana.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - Notable authors and writers
17. Which of these films was directed by David Lean?
A Brief Encounter
B Four Weddings and a Funeral
C The Killing Fields
D Women in Love
Correct Answer: Brief Encounter
Explanation: Brief Encounter119451, directed by David Lean.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry - Some famous British films
18. What is the common name for Yeoman Warders at the Tower of London?
A Beefeaters
B Crown Guards
C Pikestaff
D Queens Men
Correct Answer: Beefeaters
Explanation: Tours are given by the Yeoman Warders, also known as Beefeaters, who tell visitors about the building's history. People can also see the Crown Jewels there.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
19. Which TWO people are famous UK sports stars?
A Dame Kelly Holmes
B Jane Austen
C Lucien Freud
D Sir Chris Hoy
Correct Answer: Dame Kelly Holmes, Sir Chris Hoy
Explanation: Sir Chris Hoy (1976-) is a Scottish cyclist who has won six gold and one silver Olympic medals. He has also won 11 world championship titles. ; Dame Kelly Holmes (1970-) won two gold medals for running in the 2004 Olympic Games. She has held a number of British and European records.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Notable British sportsmen and women
20. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
In 1830s and 1840s a group called the Chartists campaigned for reform to the voting system.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: In the 1830s and 1840s, a group called the Chartists campaigned for reform.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The development of British democracy
21. How are local councils funded?
A From central government and local taxes
B From local businesses
C Through donations from local people
D Through money raised from local fundraising events
Correct Answer: From central government and local taxes
Explanation: They are funded by money from central government and by local taxes. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Local government
22. Why is 1918 an important date in the history of Women's rights?
A Equal pay laws were passed
B The first divorce laws were introduced
C Women were given the right to vote
D Women were made legally responsible for their child.
Correct Answer: Women were given the right to vote
Explanation: However, by 1918 most of these reforms had been adopted. The voting franchise was also extended to women over 30, and then in 1928 to men and women over 21. In 1969, the voting age was reduced to 18 for men and women. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The development of British democracy
23. Who elects Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs)?
A Members of Parliament
B The Home Office
C The police
D The public
Correct Answer: The public
Explanation: In November 2012, the public elected Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) in England and Wales. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The police and their duties
24. Which TWO courts deals with minor criminal cases in the UK?
A Centre Court
B Crown Court
C Justice of the Peace Court
D Magistrates' Court
Correct Answer: Magistrates' Court, Justice of the Peace Court
Explanation: In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, most minor criminal cases are dealt with in a Magistrates' Court. In Scotland, minor criminal offences go to a Justice of the Peace Court. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Criminal courts - Magistrates' and Justice of the Peace Courts