You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Britain and Germany developed Concorde, a passenger supersonic aircraft
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Britain and France developed Concorde, the world's only supersonic passenger aircraft.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
2. King Edward I of England annexed Wales to the crown of England by which statute?
A The Statute of Caernarfon
B The Statute of Carmarthen
C The Statute of Gwynedd
D The Statute of Rhuddlan
Correct Answer: The Statute of Rhuddlan
Explanation: In 1284 King Edward I of England introduced the Statute of Rhuddlan, which annexed Wales to the Crown of England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Middle Ages - War at home and abroad
3. Which of these countries did not fight on the side of the Allied Powers during the First World War?
A Bulgaria
B Italy
C Serbia
D US
Correct Answer: Bulgaria
Explanation: The Allies fought against the Central Powers - mainly Germany, the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the Ottoman Empire and later Bulgaria.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The First World War
4. In what way was Elizabeth I skilled at managing Parliament?
A She established a balance between Catholics and protestants
B She reduced the power of parliament so her wishes had more significance
Correct Answer: She established a balance between Catholics and protestants
Explanation: Elizabeth did not ask about people's real beliefs. She succeeded in finding a balance between the views of Catholics and the more extreme Protestants. In this way, she avoided any serious religious conflict within England.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Religious conflicts
5. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The MacDonald clan of Glencoe were massacred.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: All Scottish clans were required formally to accept William as king by taking an oath. The MacDonalds of Glencoe were late in taking the oath and were all killed.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Glorious Revolution
6. During the reign of which king of England was the Domesday Book complied?
A Alfred the Great
B Harold
C Kenneth MacAlpin
D William the Conqueror
Correct Answer: William the Conqueror
Explanation: William sent people all over England to draw up lists of all the towns and villages. The people who lived there, who owned the land and what animals they owned were also listed. This was called Domesday Book.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Early Britain -- The Norman Conquest
7. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Briton Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web and it was successfully used for the first time on 25 December 1990.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: The inventor of the World Wide Web, Sir Tin Berners-Lee (1955-), is British. Information was successfully transferred via the web for the first time on 25 December 1990.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
8. There was growth in British film, fashion and music during the 1960s. Which TWO of these were very popular sixties British pop groups?
A Abba
B The Beach Boys
C The Beatles
D The Rolling Stones
Correct Answer: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones
Explanation: Two well-known pop music groups at the time were The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Social change in the 1960s
9. People usually spend Christmas Day at home and enjoy a special meal that normally includes Christmas pudding, mince pies and which meat?
A Duck
B Guinea fowl
C Pork
D Turkey
Correct Answer: Turkey
Explanation: Christmas is celebrated in a traditional way. People usually spend the day at home and eat a special meal, which often includes roast turkey, Christmas pudding and mince pies.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - The main Christian festival
10. Which of these statements is correct?
A 11 November commemorates soldiers who died in World War One as well as those who have died in all conflicts involving the UK since then.
B 11 November only commemorates soldiers who died in World War One.
Correct Answer: 11 November commemorates soldiers who died in World War One as well as those who have died in all conflicts involving the UK since then.
Explanation: Remembrance Day, 11 November, commemorates those who died fighting for the UK and its allies. Originally it commemorated the dead of the First World War, which ended on 11 November 1918.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and tradition
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A All shops in the UK close on Sunday.
B Most shops in the UK open seven days a week.
Correct Answer: Most shops in the UK open seven days a week.
Explanation: Most shops in the UK are open seven days a week, although trading hours on Sundays and public holidays are generally reduced.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Shopping
12. Is the statement below TRUE or FASLE?
Dundee and Aberdeen are cities in Northern Ireland.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: Dundee and Aberdeen are cities of Scotland.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
13. Which TWO events are religious festivals?
A Bonfire Night
B Boxing Day
C Christmas Day
D Easter
Correct Answer: Christmas Day, Easter
Explanation: Christmas Day, 25 December, celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ. It is a public holiday. Many Christians go to church on Christmas Eve (24 December) or on Christmas Day itself. ; Easter takes place in March or April. It marks the death of Jesus Christ on Good Friday and his rising from the dead on Easter Sunday. Both Good Friday and the following Monday, called Easter Monday, are public holidays.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and tradition - The main Christian festivals
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is financed by selling adverting space during television programmes.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The money from TV licences is used to pay for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC).
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Television and radio
15. Who or what were jesters?
A Combatants on horseback at medieval feasts
B Men who organised hunts in the Middle Ages
C People who told jokes at medieval royal courts
D Silver coins of the 18th century
Correct Answer: People who told jokes at medieval royal courts
Explanation: Medieval kings and rich nobles had jesters who told jokes and made fun of people in the Court.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - British comedy
16. Near which of these cities is Europe's longest dry ski slope?
A Aberdeen
B Edinburgh
C Inverness
D Pitlochrie
Correct Answer: Edinburgh
Explanation: Skiing is increasingly popular in the UK. Many people go abroad to ski and there are also dry ski slopes throughout the UK. Skiing on snow may also be possible during the winter. There are five ski centres in Scotland, as well as Europe's longest dry ski slope near Edinburgh.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Skiing
17. What is the name of a novel Jane Austen?
A Far from the Madding Crowd
B Oliver Twist
C Our Man in Havana
D Sense and Sensibility
Correct Answer: Sense and Sensibility
Explanation: Jane Austen (1775-1817) was an English novelist. Her books include Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility. Her novels are concerned with marriage and family relationships. Many have been made into television programmes or films.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - literature - Notable authors and writers
18. Which of these statements is correct?
A Chequers is the Prime Minister's country house.
B Chequers is the Prime Minister's house in London.
Correct Answer: Chequers is the Prime Minister's country house.
Explanation: The Prime Minister (PM) is the leader of the political party in power. He or she appoints the members of the cabinet (see below) and has control over many important public appointments. The official home of the Prime Minister is 10 Downing Street, in central London, near the Houses of Parliament. He or she also has a country house outside London called Chequers.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The Prime Minister
19. Who opens the new parliamentary session each year?
A The Archbishop of Canterbury
B The Prime Minister
C The Speaker of the House of Commons
D The monarch
Correct Answer: The monarch
Explanation: The Queen has important ceremonial roles, such as the opening of the new parliamentary session each year. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and you role - The British constitution - The Monarchy
20. What is the title of the UK National Anthem?
A Almighty is the Queen
B God save the Queen
C Long live the Monarch
D Long live the Queen
Correct Answer: God save the Queen
Explanation: 'God save our gracious Queen!, Long live our noble Queen!, God save the Queen!
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The British constitution - The monarchy - The National Anthem
21. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
An example of a civil law case is when you have purchased a faulty item and made a legal complaint.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Examples of civil laws are:
-Consumer rights: an example of this is a dispute about faulty goods or services.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Respecting the law - The law in the UK
22. A vehicle more than three years old must pass an MOT test every year. What does MOT stand for?
A Maintenance of Transportation
B Migrant Order for Transport
C Ministry of Transport
D Motor-vehicle Optimisation Test
Correct Answer: Ministry of Transport
Explanation: You must also have valid motor insurance. It is a serious criminal offence to drive without insurance. If your vehicle is over three years old, you must take it for a Ministry of Transport (MOT) test every year. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - Driving
23. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
There are no differences between the court systems of England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: There are some differences between the court systems in England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Criminal courts
24. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Council of Europe has the power to make laws, which are binding in member states.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The Council of Europe is separate from the EU. It has 47 member countries, including the UK, and is responsible for the protection and promotion of human rights in those countries. It has no power to make laws but draws up conventions and charters, the most well-known of which is the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, usually called the European Convention on Human Rights.
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The Council of Europe