You have 45 minutes to answer 24 multiple choice Life in the UK Test questions. You need to answer at least 18 out of 24 questions correctly to pass. Answers may be reviewed after each question or at the end of the test. Good luck!

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List of questions in above test (quick view). Click question box to reveal correct answer.
1. Which TWO are plays by William Shakespeare?
A A Midsummer Night's Dream
B Oliver Twist
C Pride and Prejudice
D Romeo and Juliet
Correct Answer: Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream
Explanation: His most famous plays include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Hamlet, Macbeth and Romeo and Juliet.
Reference:
2. Which of these statements is correct?
A Sake Dean Mahomet introduced curry houses and shampooing to Britain from India.
B Sake Dean Mahomet is famous for introducing tea-drinking and bungalows to Britain from India.
Correct Answer: Sake Dean Mahomet introduced curry houses and shampooing to Britain from India.
Explanation: In 1810 he opened the Hindoostanee Coffee House in George Street, London. It was the first curry house to open in Britain. Mahomet and his wife also introduced 'shampooing', the Indian art of head massage, to Britain.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The Industrial Revolution
3. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
We shall fight them on the beaches 'is a famous quote from a speech by Queen Elizabeth I about the Spanish Armada.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: W e shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender' Speech to the House of Commons after Dunkirk 1940
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The 20th century - The Second World War
4. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Civil War between Charles I and Parliament in the mid-17th century led to Oliver Cromwell becoming king of England.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: England declared itself a republic, called the Commonwealth. It no longer had a monarch. For a time, it was not totally clear how the country would be governed. For now, the army was in control.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - Oliver Cromwell and the English republic
5. Which part of the UK is associated with Robert Burns (1759-96)?
A England
B Northern Ireland
C Scotland
D Wales
Correct Answer: Scotland
Explanation: Known in Scotland as 'The Bard', Robert Burns was a Scottish poet.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - The rebellion of the clans
6. Which of these statements is correct?
A The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1930's
B The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1950's.
Correct Answer: The jet engine and radar were developed in Britain in the 1930's
Explanation: Radar was developed by Scotsman Sir Robert Watson-Watt (1892-1973), who proposed that enemy aircraft could be detected by radio waves. The first successful radar test took place in 1935. The jet engine was developed in Britain in the 1930s by Sir Frank Whittle (1907-96), a British Royal Air Force engineer officer.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - Britain since 1945 - Some great British inventions of the 20th century
7. Napoleon fought battles against which TWO of the following?
A Francis Drake
B Horatio Nelson
C Oliver Cromwell
D The Duke of Wellington
Correct Answer: The Duke of Wellington, Horatio Nelson
Explanation: Napoleon, who became Emperor of France, continued the war. Britain's navy fought against combined French and Spanish fleets, winning the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Admiral Nelson was in charge of the British fleet at Trafalgar and was killed in the battle. Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square, London, is a monument to him. His ship, HMS Victory, can be visited in Portsmouth. The British army also fought against the French. In 1815, the French Wars ended with the defeat of the Emperor Napoleon by the Duke of Wellington at the Battle of Waterloo. Wellington was known as the Iron Duke and later became Prime Minister.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - A global power - War with France
8. Mary Stuart, the queen of Scotland, was often known by which other name?
A Bloody Mary
B Mary Tudor
C Mary, Queen of Scots
D Mary, Queen of the Highlands
Correct Answer: Mary, Queen of Scots
Explanation: The queen of Scotland, Mary Stuart (often now called 'Mary, Queen of Scots') was a Catholic.
Reference: Chapter 3: A long and illustrious history - The Tudors and Stuarts - The Reformation in Scotland and Mary, Queen of Scots
9. Which of these statements is correct?
A 11 November commemorates soldiers who died in World War One as well as those who have died in all conflicts involving the UK since then.
B 11 November only commemorates soldiers who died in World War One.
Correct Answer: 11 November commemorates soldiers who died in World War One as well as those who have died in all conflicts involving the UK since then.
Explanation: Remembrance Day, 11 November, commemorates those who died fighting for the UK and its allies. Originally it commemorated the dead of the First World War, which ended on 11 November 1918.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Customs and traditions - Other festivals and tradition
10. Which of these statements is correct?
A Big Ben is the nickname of the great bell in the clock tower of the Houses of Parliament.
B Big ben is a popular children's television character.
Correct Answer: Big Ben is the nickname of the great bell in the clock tower of the Houses of Parliament.
Explanation: Big Ben is the nickname for the great bell of the clock at the Houses of Parliament in London. Many people call the clock Big Ben as well.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Places of interest - UK landmarks
11. Which of these statements is correct?
A The BBC is funded through advertisements and subscriptions.
B The BBC is the only wholly state-funded media organisation.
Correct Answer: The BBC is the only wholly state-funded media organisation.
Explanation: The BBC is the largest broadcaster in the world. It is the only wholly state-funded media organisation that is independent of government.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Television and radio
12. William Shakespeare wrote a number of sonnets. What are sonnets?
A Mystery plays
B Poems of 14 lines
C Rhyming poems
D Stories for children
Correct Answer: Poems of 14 lines
Explanation: Shakespeare wrote many sonnets (poems which must be 14 lines long) and some longer poems.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Arts and culture - Literature - British poets
13. What is the capital city of Wales?
A Cardiff
B Newport
C Plymouth
D Swansea
Correct Answer: Cardiff
Explanation: Wales: The capital city of Wales is Cardiff
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - The UK today - Cities of the UK
14. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
Dame Judi Dench, Colin Firth and Sir Anthony Hopkins have all won Oscars.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Recent British actors to have won Oscars include Colin Firth, Sir Antony Hopkins, Dame Judi Dench, Kate Winslet and Tilde Swinton.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Leisure - Films - British film industry
15. Near which of these cities is Europe's longest dry ski slope?
A Aberdeen
B Edinburgh
C Inverness
D Pitlochrie
Correct Answer: Edinburgh
Explanation: Skiing is increasingly popular in the UK. Many people go abroad to ski and there are also dry ski slopes throughout the UK. Skiing on snow may also be possible during the winter. There are five ski centres in Scotland, as well as Europe's longest dry ski slope near Edinburgh.
Reference: Chapter 4: A modern, thriving society - Sport - Skiing
16. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
The Council of Europe has the power to make laws, which are binding in member states.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: FALSE
Explanation: The Council of Europe is separate from the EU. It has 47 member countries, including the UK, and is responsible for the protection and promotion of human rights in those countries. It has no power to make laws but draws up conventions and charters, the most well-known of which is the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, usually called the European Convention on Human Rights.
Reference: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The Council of Europe
17. Which is an aim of the United Nations?
A To create a single free trade market
B To examine decisions made by the European Union
C To prevent war and promote international peace and security
D To promote dictatorship
Correct Answer: To prevent war and promote international peace and security
Explanation: The UN was set up after the Second World War and aims to prevent war and promote international peace and security. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The United Nations
18. Which TWO are political parties in the UK?
A Conservatives party
B Labour party
C Modern party
D Office party
Correct Answer: Labour party, Conservatives party
Explanation: Anyone aged 18 or over can stand for election as an MP but they are unlikely to win unless they have been nominated to represent one of the major political parties. These are the Conservative Party, the Labour Party, the Liberal Democrats, or one of the parties representing Scottish, Welsh or Northern Irish interests. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - The party system
19. In 1999 which TWO new national bodies were established?
A English Parliament
B Houses of Lords
C Scottish Parliament
D Welsh Assembly
Correct Answer: Scottish Parliament, Welsh Assembly
Explanation: There has been a Welsh Assembly and a Scottish Parliament since 1999. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Devolved administrations
20. Is the statement below TRUE or FALSE?
 Members of the armed forces cannot stand for public office.
A FALSE
B TRUE
Correct Answer: TRUE
Explanation: Most citizens of the UK, the Irish Republic or the Commonwealth aged 18 or over can stand for public office. There are some exceptions, including:
-members of the armed forces ;
-civil servants ;
-people found guilty of certain criminal offences.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The government - Standing for office
21. What is the minimum age for jury service?
A 16
B 18
C 22
D 30
Correct Answer: 18
Explanation: As well as getting the right to vote, people on the electoral register are randomly selected to serve on a jury. Anyone who is on the electoral register and is aged 18 to 70 can be asked to do this. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - How you can support your community - Jury service
22. Who is the ceremonial head of the Commonwealth?
A The President of the USA
B The Prime Minister
C The Prince of Wales
D The Queen
Correct Answer: The Queen
Explanation: The Queen is the ceremonial head of the Commonwealth, which currently has 54 member states.
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The UK and international institutions - The Commonwealth
23. Which of these statements is correct?
A The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people settle minor disputes without needing a lawyer.
B The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people who have been victims of identity theft or fraud.
Correct Answer: The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people settle minor disputes without needing a lawyer.
Explanation: The small claims procedure is an informal way of helping people to settle minor disputes without spending a lot of time and money using a lawyer. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of courts - Civil courts - The small claims procedure
24. Which of these statements is correct?
A In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Crown Court
B In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Sheriff Court
Correct Answer: In Scotland, serious offences are tried in a Sheriff Court
Explanation: In Scotland, serious cases are heard in a Sheriff Court with either a sheriff or a sheriff with a jury. 
Reference: Chapter 5: The UK government, the law and your role - The role of the courts - Crown Courts and Sheriff Courts